drive-by download

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drive-by download

A program that is automatically installed in a computer by merely visiting a website without explicitly clicking on a link. Typically installing spyware that reports information back to the vendor, drive-by downloads are deployed by exploiting flaws in the browser and operating system code. The best deterrent is to routinely install security updates to the software in the device. See drive-by install and spyware.
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Drive-by downloads are also (http://www.ibtimes.com/torrent-sites-pirate-bay-expose-12-million-computers-malware-every-month-study-2218672) widely used on illegal piracy sites , helping make up the $70 million that content thieves reaped in 2015.
Keep the endpoints and software well-patched to protect against drive-by downloads that exploit vulnerable software and applications.
These scans include searching for defacement, database vulnerabilities, application vulnerabilities, and drive-by downloads.
Although removable media and local networks are still the primary method for spreading malware in the region, there is an increase in the use of drive-by downloads which exploit vulnerabilities in browsers and their plug-ins.
EMET's true value is in stopping common attacks like those seen in drive-by downloads and black-hole infected sites.
Meanwhile, drive-by downloads hosting exploits (often used by malvertising and watering hole attacks), Dynamic DNS (often used as an evasion technique against IP blacklisting) and Mobile Threats are new individual categories added to enhance protection and improve reporting granularity.
They are protected from popular threat vectors including those aimed at file system entry, drive-by downloads, or system exploits and vulnerabilities.
Drive-by downloads attacks have been around for a number of years.
"These kinds of attacks are known as 'drive-by downloads' as users don't have to click or download any files for their computer to be infected," said a spokesman.
In his talk, Balazs explained how malicious extensions in Firefox, Chrome and Safari have been created by attackers that try to get them added to the user's browser through Web-based drive-by downloads or infected attachments.
Image searches: Cybercriminals embed drive-by downloads in popular images, then make sure those images show up in image searches.
These compromised websites can then be used to conduct drive-by downloads, which actually download malicious files onto the user's system without their knowledge or authorization."