playa

(redirected from Dry lakebed)
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playa

[′plī·ə]
(geology)
A low, essentially flat part of a basin or other undrained area in an arid region.
A small, generally sandy land area at the mouth of a stream or along the shore of a bay.
A flat, alluvial coastland, as distinguished from a beach.
References in periodicals archive ?
I've come to a massive dry lakebed in the hopes of executing car-commercial stunts like dusty drifts and figure 8s.
The 12-mile desert race track has been prepared by 317 members of the local Mier community, who have moved 16,000 tonnes of rock from 22 million square metres of dry lakebed.
The playa is the enormous, flat, dry lakebed of ancient Lake Lahontan.
In the coming years, changes in water availability and management in the Imperial Valley are expected to decrease inflows to the Salton Sea, reducing its size and exposing large areas of dry lakebed, or playa.
It's about 20 miles (30 km) long in what looks like a larger, dry lakebed. Other features suggest the beds of once-running rivers, presumably nitrogen.
With visibility greatly reduced due to a brownout, the crew circumnavigated a tree line and undulating terrain, safely landing in a dry lakebed. In the few seconds prior to landing, Corporal Brett Hankins ensured that all crew chiefs were secured in crashworthy seats.
In April 1955, the CIA chose a remote dry lakebed in the Nevada desert as a testing ground, which was designated on maps as Area 51.
When we reached Ewaninga's dry lakebed, which was to be our viewing spot, we realized that part of the lake was not dry!
They found large dunes of coarse-grained sediment, 5 million to 6 million years old, near the sides of the dry lakebed; preserved in the dunes are patterns of strong water currents that flowed in many directions.
Cassini radar images from the spacecraft's September 7th close Titan flyby reveal a dry lakebed and channel networks in the southern hemisphere similar to what was seen by Huygens in a different location.
Future Cassini observations may help scientists determine whether the feature really is a lake, or whether it's a dry lakebed, volcanic caldera, or something else.
We entered the route by the Owens Dry Lakebed at 200 feet and 450 knots, strung out a mile in trail between each jet.