dry farming

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dry farming,

farming system adopted in areas having an annual rainfall of approximately 15 to 20 in. (38.1–50.8 cm)—with much of the rainfall in the spring and early summer—where irrigation is impractical. Seeding rates are used that correspond to the soil water supply; management practices that minimize water loss and soil erosion are also utilized. The land is often summer-fallowed (not used for crops) in alternate years to conserve moisture. Dry-land crops must be either drought-resistant or drought-evasive, i.e., maturing in late spring or fall; special varieties of crops such as wheat, barley, corn, sorghum, and rye are often used.

dry farming

[¦dri ′färm·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Production of crops in regions having sparse rainfall without the use of irrigation by employing cultivation techniques that conserve soil moisture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Within the dryland farming zone the estimated N balance is positive, mainly due to N-fixation by legumes in permanent pastures.
In the late nineteenth century the westward push in the US continued, encouraged by a false gospel that intensive dryland farming was feasible west of the hundredth meridian.
This knowledge based approach will bring immense returns particularly in Rainfed and Dryland farming areas," Patil stated.
The Western Canada Farm Progress Show is Canada's largest annual agricultural trade show, and focuses on innovation and technology, mostly for dryland farming practices.
NEW DELHI -- Seized with the need to push for farm sector reforms, a workshop on enhancing productivity in rainfed and dryland farming saw President Pratibha Patil push for out-of-the-box solutions to curb spiraling food inflation.
Eight chapters include topics like: Hawaiian agro-ecosystems and their spatial distribution, the archaeology of dryland farming systems in southeastern Maui, and the leeward Kohala field system.
1) He explains that much of the data on habitat resources under perennial revegetation in the dryland farming systems of the Western Australian wheatbelt has focused on birds.
In dryland farming, water use efficiency is an important factor for sustainability.
We expect dryland farming in this region to keep increasing, so we need to know what cropping systems work best in this type of farming," Acosta-Martinez says.
This social construction of agricultural landscape can be found from the folklores of different regions which provide the social and cultural meaning and perception of land, rain, seeds, water and drought in dryland farming societies.