Dryopithecinae

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dryopithecinae

 

a subfamily of fossil anthropoid apes. Remains of dryopithecids (lower jaws, teeth, bones of limbs) have been found in the Miocene and Pliocene deposits of Western Europe, Africa, and South Asia (India). Dryopithecids varied in size from the present-day chimpanzee to the gorilla. According to some scholars, they were the ancestors of modern anthropoids and man.

REFERENCES

Osnovy paleontologii. Mlekopitaiushchie. Moscow, 1962.
Iakimov, V. P. Adaptivnaia radiatsiia vysshikh obez’ian v tretichnom i nachale chetvertichnogo periodov. Moscow, 1964.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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(2011), their dental morphology indicates that they can be attributed to the Dryopithecinae, and most likely, any of the three dryopithecine genera recorded at Abocador de Can Mata (Pierolapithecus, Anoiapithecus, Dryopithecus).
Whereas Miocene hominoids from Asia are generally regarded as pongines (i.e., members of the orangutan clade) (Kelley, 2002; Begun, 2007), the Miocene hominoids from Europe, here included into the Dryopithecinae, have been variously considered to be stem hominids (e.g., CasanovasVilar et al., 2011), pongines (e.g., Agusti et al., 1996) or hominines (e.g., Begun, 2009; Begun et al., 2012).