Dubawnt

Dubawnt

(do͝obônt`), river, 580 mi (933 km) long, rising in Wholdaia Lake, Nunavut Territory, Canada, and flowing NE to Dubawnt Lake (c.1,600 sq mi/4,140 sq km) then E to Baker Lake at the head of Chesterfield Inlet of Hudson Bay.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dubawnt

 

a river in Canada (Northwest Territories), in the system of the Thelon River; it discharges into Chesterfield Inlet of Hudson Bay. Length, 83.0 km; basin area, about 67,000 sq km. The Dubawnt originates in the Laurentian Highlands and flows across it, passing through numerous lakes, including the Dubawnt, Wholdaia and Wharton. There is spring flooding and low-water period in late summer. Lake Dubawnt has ice on it even during the summer.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hjalmar stayed near the Thelon, trapping in the Dubawnt River barren lands, during 1930-32.
On Mosquito Lake, Dubawnt Lake, and other trophy venues in the tundra, whenever "Numbers" Nelson hooked up on a trolling pass, I reeled in quickly and pitched plastic out over 80- to 100-foot depths, hooking up about every fourth or fifth time.
In "Oolulik" the white protagonist/narrator battles blizzard and deadly cold on his mission to rescue the starving "people of the deer" stranded at Dubawnt Lake.
Alphonse Gaste traveled even farther north, from the headwaters down the "Kazan" during April, overland to Dubawnt Lake, and back.
Their successful expedition route was through Dubawnt Lake to Baker Lake and back to Churchill, Manitoba, along the western coast of Hudson Bay.
Tyrrell already had Hearne's maps and the key maps of Ithingo Campbell and Gabriel Thieelzoa, so he was aware that a river flowed northward and eastward of his 1893 exploration route down the Dubawnt.
The woodlands bordering the lake and nearby Dubawnt River teemed with such numbers of caribou that the Chipewyan hunters, using pounds constructed of bushy trees and snares made of rawhide, could easily provide enough meat for the entire community.
This vision of Eden upon the Dubawnt caused Hearne to become quite philosophical about the impact of European contact on Native Americans.
Tyrrell, who in his work for the Geological Survey travelled the Dubawnt and Thelon rivers in 1893 and the Kazan and Ferguson rivers in 1894.
WHERE ON HIS RETURN ROUTE DID HEARNE PROBABLY STRIKE THE DUBAWNT RIVER?
The specific question posed in the heading for this section, however, is difficult to answer for the following reasons: 1) we do not know precisely where Hearne crossed Anaunethad Lake; 2) we do not know whether his homeward route was totally independent of his outgoing route (published map) or whether it split off from his outgoing route at the Dubawnt River (manuscript map); and 3) there are many days for which Hearne gave no estimate of miles travelled.