Constitutional Law

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Related to Due Process Clauses: due process of law

Constitutional Law

 

a term used in legal and political writings to denote the branch of law that governs relations set down in the constitution or in legislative instruments promulgated for the observance of the constitution. In the USSR the term commonly used is state law.

References in periodicals archive ?
Part of this Essay's project, then, is to shift the terrain on which the battle over the Due Process Clause is waged.
Eldridge, (40) which interprets the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendment Due Process Clauses in the federal and state administrative settings.
If the State has not "given anything for which it can ask return" in respect of the person, property, or transaction it seeks to tax, the Commerce and Due Process Clauses operate to limit the State's raw power to tax.
The United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania entered judgment for the employer but the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit reversed the judgment and held that, based on the due process clause, a state employee is entitled to a pre-suspension hearing before being suspended without pay.
An informed study of the work of the Supreme Court of the United States will probably lead to the conclusion that no nine men are wise enough and good enough to be entrusted with the power which the unlimited provisions of the due process clauses confer.
The court held that if the defendants acted with "deliberate indifference" and that indifference resulted in injury to the voters, the state defendants would be in violation of the Due Process Clause.
Where in our early cases can we find an understanding that the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment protects fundamental, substantive liberties?
435, 444 (1940), the Commerce and Due Process Clauses operate as a constitutional brake upon the State's raw power to tax.
Kenneth Blackwell, Governor Bob Taft, and their predecessors have failed to protect the fundamental rights of eligible Ohio voters to cast a meaningful ballot, as required by the Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.
Acknowledged unenumerated rights are equally operative under the Due Process Clauses of either the Fifth or Fourteenth Amendments.
Hence, on its face, the rule violates the over-arching principle of the Commerce and Due Process Clauses that an apportionment formula must, first and foremost, be fair.
Malone ruled that two sections of the Lobbying Act "violate the due process clauses of both the New York state and the United States constitutions in failing to provide for notice and a hearing prior to the commission determining whether a person or entity has knowingly and willfully violated the Lobbying Act.