dugout

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dugout:

see canoecanoe
, long, narrow watercraft with sharp ends originally used by most peoples. It is usually propelled by means of paddles, although sails and, more recently, outboard motors are also used.
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dugout

[′dəg‚au̇t]
(ordnance)
Underground shelter built to protect troops, ammunition, and material from gunfire.

dugout

A primitive shelter, often consisting of an excavation in a bank of sloping terrain that is roofed with bark laid over a pole framework, then covered with sod; also see half-dugout.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Concrete dug-outs are not ideal so close to the pitch and he came flying in at a fair rate of knots.
``I think someone should perhaps look at the size of dug-outs and decide on how many people should be allowed there,'' he said.
Harry's definitely got a point, maybe dug-outs should be protected a bit more."
The Frenchman fears players and coaches on the touchline are at risk of attack also because dug-outs are too small to protect them.
It used to be referees who received most stick but if you listen to Gordon Strachan, Martin O'Neill, Martin Jol, Jimmy Calderwood and others you'll realise that the worst job in the world is currently standing in front of the mouthy fans situated behind dug-outs.
"We have always wanted the dug-outs to be positioned on the stand side, away from the social club," added Glenn.
The two signallers in the dug-out thought that we were hit, but we had not been touched.
"In those days we used mobile phones because the dug-outs and dressing-rooms at Bloomfield Road were on opposite sides of the ground.
"But I think Harry has definitely got a point and it's something we, as a club, will start discussing now because it's happened so close to the dug-out.
And he has been impressed to find a laptop in the home dug-out that shows boss Chris Coleman live coverage of the game so he can review controversial moments.
A few days later I visited Duffy in his dug-out: he was now a company stretcher-bearer.