Duke of Buckingham


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Duke of Buckingham

Richard III’s “counsel’s consistory”; assisted him to throne. [Br. Lit.: Richard III]
References in classic literature ?
Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, son of him who played so conspicuous a part in the early chapters of this history, -- Villiers of Buckingham, a handsome cavalier, melancholy with women, a jester with men, -- and Wilmot, Lord Rochester, a jester with both sexes, were standing at this moment before the Lady Henrietta, disputing the privilege of making her smile.
D'Artagnan, as we know, was easily affronted, and the Duke of Buckingham's tone displeased him.
"I am more fortunate than you, sir," replied D'Artagnan, "for I have had the honor of knowing your family, and particularly my lord Duke of Buckingham, your illustrious father."
Nevertheless, isolated as he was, we must say that the Duke of Buckingham did not experience an instant of fear.
The favorite of two kings, immensely rich, all-powerful in a kingdom which he disordered at his fancy and calmed again at his caprice, George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, had lived one of those fabulous existences which survive, in the course of centuries, to astonish posterity.
TO THE RIGHT HONORABLE MY VERY GOOD LORD THE DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM HIS GRACE, LORD HIGH ADMIRAL OF ENGLAND EXCELLENT LORD:
At dusk, the Parliamentarians stormed Worcester and Charles was forced to flee with a handful of followers including the Duke of Buckingham, Lord Wilmot and the Earl of Derby.
The lad was originally sold by his father to George Villiers, the Duke of Buckingham, who trained him to spy on the king and his then 17-year-old bride.A
Originally built as a private townhouse for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703, Buckingham House was bought by George III in 1761 for his wife Queen Charlotte to use as a cosy family home.
The great Raja Ravi Verma's work executed in 1881 depicting the Maharaja of Travancore and his younger brother welcoming Richard Temple-Grenville, the third Duke of Buckingham got sold for Rs 14 crore.
Alastair Bellany and Thomas Cogswell's book similarly centers on a single event--or, more accurately, an alleged but probably nonexistent event--namely the poisoning of the British King James I on the orders of his favorite, the Duke of Buckingham, in 1625.