Duke of Buckingham


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Duke of Buckingham

Richard III’s “counsel’s consistory”; assisted him to throne. [Br. Lit.: Richard III]
References in classic literature ?
Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, son of him who played so conspicuous a part in the early chapters of this history, -- Villiers of Buckingham, a handsome cavalier, melancholy with women, a jester with men, -- and Wilmot, Lord Rochester, a jester with both sexes, were standing at this moment before the Lady Henrietta, disputing the privilege of making her smile.
I am more fortunate than you, sir," replied D'Artagnan, "for I have had the honor of knowing your family, and particularly my lord Duke of Buckingham, your illustrious father.
Nevertheless, isolated as he was, we must say that the Duke of Buckingham did not experience an instant of fear.
The favorite of two kings, immensely rich, all-powerful in a kingdom which he disordered at his fancy and calmed again at his caprice, George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, had lived one of those fabulous existences which survive, in the course of centuries, to astonish posterity.
It was originally a three-story block house owned by John Sheffield, the Duke of Buckingham.
They learn of Cardinal Richelieu's (Christoph Waltz) plot to impugn the Duke of Buckingham (Orlando Bloom), and hatch a plan to stop him.
With the help of M'Lady (Milla Jovovich), D'Artagnan and the Musketeers learn of a plot masterminded by Cardinal Richelieu (Christoph Waltz) to impugn the Duke of Buckingham (Orlando Bloom).
The 17th-century painting of George Villiers, the 1st Duke of Buckingham, was believed to have been a copy of the lost original.
The portrait of George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham was thought to be a copy of the lost original.
Although the history of the site dates back to the Middle Ages, the palace as we know it today started life as a townhouse for the Duke of Buckingham, which was built in 1703.
Almost 500 years old, it was intended as a home for Edward Stafford, the Duke of Buckingham, and was almost finished in 1521, when his distant cousin, Henry VIII, accused him of treason.
The castle was built between 1510 and 1521 by Edward Stafford, the third Duke of Buckingham, although the Duke obviously fell foul of Henry as in the year it was completed he was arrested for treason and later beheaded.