Dumbbell nebula


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Dumbbell nebula

(M27; NGC 6853) A planetary nebula in the constellation Vulpecula. It has an hourglass shape (330 × 900 arc seconds) and a magnitude of 7.6.

Dumbbell Nebula

[′dəm‚bel ′neb·yə·lə]
(astronomy)
A planetary nebula of large apparent diameter and low surface brightness in the constellation Vulpecula, about 220 parsecs (4.2 × 1015 miles or 6.8 × 1015 kilometers) away.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The first two indicate a supposed resemblance to the Dumbbell Nebula (M27) in Vulpecula, while the last depicts the shape of its bar.
It's M27, the Dumbbell Nebula, a gray puffball just to the upper left of the tip of Sagitta, the Arrow.
STAR STRUCK: Galaxy NGC7476, above, was observed in August; and the Little Dumbbell Nebula, right, in July
They show material being ejected from dying stars called the Exposed Cranium Nebula, the Ghost of Jupiter Nebula and the Little Dumbbell Nebula.
While Messier 27, the Dumbbell Nebula, is probably one of the favourite Messier objects to observe and image, its little brother M76--the Little Dumbbell--seems to be rather overlooked.
The same telescope will also show you the planetary nebula, M76 (Little Dumbbell Nebula).
I was rewarded for staying up and was able to see the deep sky object M27 (the Dumbbell nebula)clearly in the night sky.
More than a century ago it was named the "Dumbbell Nebula" for its resemblance to a 19th-century weightlifter's dumbbell.
M57, the Ring Nebula in Lyra, and M27, the Dumbbell Nebula in Vulpecula, lie on a line with the renowned double star Albireo, or Beta ([beta]) Cygni, which shines about midway between them.
The fainter one lies near the planetary nebula M27, also known as the Dumbbell Nebula. In a finderscope, the star marks the western peak of an M shaped by five stars, and the Dumbbell is just south of the M 's central star.
Almost universally referred to as the Dumbbell Nebula, the brightest parts of M27 really do look like a handheld workout weight.