Duncan Rebellion of 1862-77

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Duncan Rebellion of 1862-77

 

the rebellion of the Dungans in China against the national oppression of the Chinese and Manchurian feudal lords and the Ch’ing (Manchu) dynasty. It began in May 1862 in the Weinan district of Shensi province, which remained the principal center of the rebellion until 1866. The province of Kansu became the focal point of the rebellion between 1866 and 1870, and then the rebellion shifted to Sinkiang from 1871 to 1877. Landlords, merchants, and the Muslim clergy took part in the rebellion, in addition to the Dungan working people. In the late 1860’s a split occurred in the camp of the rebels: the exploiter leadership bowed out of the movement, and Pai Yen-hu, a representative of the working people, took control of the rebellion. The Chinese generals Tso Tsung-t’ang and Liu Chinfang cruelly suppressed the Dungan Rebellion. The surviving Dungan insurgents, led by Pai Yen-hu, crossed the border and settled in Russia in 1877 with the consent of the tsarist government.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.