Dunsinane


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Dunsinane

(dŭn'sĭnān`), westernmost of the Sidlaw Hills, 1,012 ft (308 m) high, Perth and Kinross, central Scotland. On its summit are ruins of a fort, called Macbeth's Castle; it is the traditional scene of MacbethMacbeth
, d. 1057, king of Scotland (1040–57). He succeeded his father as governor of the province of Moray c.1031 and was a military commander for Duncan I. In 1040 he killed Duncan in battle and seized the throne.
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's final defeat as related by Shakespeare.

Dunsinane

a hill in central Scotland, in the Sidlaw Hills: the ruined fort at its summit is regarded as Macbeth's castle. Height: 308 m (1012 ft.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Several Members of Parliament and Central Provincial Council, senior Government officials as well as officials from Plantation Human Development Trust(PHDT), Regional Plantation Companies and a huge number of people from the Dunsinane Estate, close to 1500, including the beneficiaries of the houses and their families attended the function.
Over 40 years on and Bamburgh once again doubled for High Dunsinane. This was but one of several early medieval era films/TV series being shot in the region this year.
It is enough to say that Macbeth thinks the second and third prophecies assure him of two things: he cannot be killed ("none of woman born / Shall harm Macbeth" [4.1.102-3]) and he will not lose the crown ("Macbeth shall never vanquish'd be until / Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill / Shall come against him" [114-16]).
Joshua Jenkins makes his National Theatre debut as Christopher with his previous theatre credits including Dunsinane, for the Royal Shakespeare Company and National Theatre of Scotland.
The night of the event, our dining room, populated by a forest of hungry, sweaty, seven-foot giants, looked as though Birnam Wood had come to Dunsinane. With the same devastating effect.
Chicago Shakespeare Theater, (312) 595-5600, www.chicagoshakes.com Dunsinane, David Greig; dir: Roxana Silbert.
John Bull ended with a short glimpse at other authors and their views of British history, past and future, as presented in Mike Bartlett's 'future history play' King Charles III (2014), David Greig's Dunsinane (2010) and Rona Munro's trilogy of King James plays (2014).
After studying a three-year acting course at LAMDA, Sam has worked in theatre and TV, including the RSC's Dunsinane, ITV's Vicious and A Winter's Tale at London's Unicorn Theatre.
But David Greig's Dunsinane – produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company in 2010 and touring again here under the wing of the National Theatre of Scotland – is a brilliant piece of work in its own right and one that speaks to the present day.
Explicitly referring to a tongue and to the acts of telling and signifying, this speech clearly, on various levels, "signifies nothing." Macbeth is cursing the witches' "forked" tongues, for what they last told him--he shall be harmed by "none of woman born" and "shall never vanquish'd be, until / Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill, / Shall come against him"--has "falsely" encouraged him, and led him to this fatal encounter with Macduff.