durable goods

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Related to Durable good: consumer durables

durable goods

[¦du̇r·ə·bəl ′gu̇dz]
(engineering)
Products whose usefulness continues for a number of years and that are not consumed or destroyed in a single usage. Also known as durables; hard goods.
References in periodicals archive ?
(14) This approximate growth rate was obtained by weighting the quarterly growth in real spending for each durable good by its nominal share in total durable goods spending in the previous quarter.
This indicates that non-durable good manufacturers may face the same type of time consistency or commitment problem (with buyers) as durable good manufacturers.
The consumer derives utility from a non-durable good N and the services of a durable good A.
Durable goods profits fell to $85.5 billion, down 32.8 percent from a year ago.
Injection molders of durable goods also acquired a taste for IML, applying it to toys, lawn and garden products, all-terrain vehicles, trash containers, and even tractor body panels.
Michael Biddle, CEO and president of MBA Polymers, says, "Major multinational manufacturers of durable goods are now working with MBA to recycle the plastics from their end-of-life products, and to provide them with recycled plastics for their new products.
The output of durable goods materials rose 0.5 percent, bringing production to a level 15.6 percent above the level in August 1999.
The government said durable goods orders, a measure of manufacturing, fell 1.3 percent in August after falling 0.7 percent in July.
The factory operating rate declined to 79.3 percent, with the easing concentrated in durable goods industries.
After an increase of 0.4 percent in June, the overall output of consumer goods slipped 0.2 percent in July; the production of durable goods was unchanged, and that of nondurable goods fell 0.3 percent.
The production of materials edged up 0.1 percent, led by another gain in the output of durable goods materials.
Within this aggregate, the production of durable goods materials advanced 1.0 percent, largely because of rebounds in the production of parts and materials used primarily by the motor vehicle industry.

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