pneumoconiosis

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pneumoconiosis

(no͞o'məkō'nēō`sĭs), chronic disease of the lungs. Primarily an occupational disease of miners, sandblasters, and metal grinders, it is a result of repeated inhalation of dusts, including iron oxides (e.g., rust and filings), silicates (e.g., talc and rock dust), and carbonates (especially coal dust). Particles collect in the lungs and become sites for the formation of fibrous nodules. As the disease progresses, fibrous tissue increasingly replaces elastic lung tissue. Loss of lung function is signaled by shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and difficulty in expectorating. A heart deficiency called cor pulmonale may develop in severe cases. Sufferers are particularly vulnerable to infectious lung diseases such as tuberculosis. Pneumoconiosis is incurable and treatment is purely symptomatic. Because the inhaled dusts cause darkening of the lung tissue, the disease is also known as black lung. Silicosis, the form of the disease prevalent among miners, is commonly called miner's lung.

pneumoconiosis

[¦nü·mō‚kō·nē′ō·səs]
(medicine)
Any lung disease caused by dust inhalation.
References in periodicals archive ?
To ex-miners - many dying from chronic dust disease - it was just another empty promise.
There are 330,000 dust disease claimants in the UK - 28,000 in Wales.
But the calculations are wildly wrong and in many cases the miners are owed massive dust disease refunds.
If clawback stays, he said, red tape would make dust disease payments even slower.
The new watchdog group, formed to speed dust disease payouts, is holding its first round of talks.
His life was blighted by the chronic dust disease he developed after 40 years down the mines.
The Welsh Secretary - the son of a miner - pledged that the Government would speed up the process under which ex-miners or their widows are assessed for compensation for dust disease.
TONY Blair yesterday claimed that every day last week pounds 1million was paid out to miners crippled by dust disease.
But the 74-year-old ex-pitman has a deadly dust disease. Never mind the Sheffield High Court, he struggles to get out of his front door.
A High Court review in Sheffield revealed the need for massive improvement settling dust disease claims.
NEW plans were unveiled last night to speed up payments to pitmen dying from dust disease.