Dusting


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Related to Dusting: Crop dusting, dusting off

dusting

[′dəst·iŋ]
(metallurgy)
Spontaneous disintegration of a material on cooling due to expansion or inversion.

Dusting

 

the application of powdered pesticides in atomized form by means of dusters; the pesticide is applied to plants, the soil, and the bodies of insects to control pests, diseases, and weeds in farm and forest crops.

Pesticides in dust form are used for dusting. The preparations used should atomize easily and settle evenly on the surfaces being treated, and they should have minimum susceptibility to being carried off by the wind. Dusting is done in the morning and evening and during the day, but only in cool, overcast weather. Dusting times depend on the biological characteristics of the pests and agents of disease in agricultural crops, and also on meteorological conditions. Dust consumption is 10–50 (usually 15–25) kg per hectare. Dusting is used in arid regions, where spraying is difficult because of the high water consumption. The main drawback of dusting is serious air pollution. Dusting is being supplanted by low-volume spraying, which is more efficient and productive.

dusting

The development of a powdered material at the surface of hardened concrete.
References in periodicals archive ?
While wet rock dusting has been around for decades, foam rock dust has been around for at least 11 years (see U.
Which of the three fingerprinting methods--dusting with baby powder, dusting with salt, or not dusting--lifted the best print?
Limestone is an excellent material for rock dusting, as it acts as a heat sink in a fire when scoured from the ribs, roof and floor of an underground coal mine.
After the 2010 coal mine explosion at the Upper Big Branch mine that claimed the lives of 29 miners [Fiscor 2011], long-established rock dusting practices and the quality of rock dust have undergone increased scrutiny.