Dvandva


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Dvandva

 

(Sanskrit), a copulative compound word. Its components are in a relationship of coordination—for example, Russian severo-zapad,“northwest”; Latin duodecim,“twelve”; and German Rotweiss,“reddish white.” The term “dvandva” was used initially in Sanskrit grammar.

References in periodicals archive ?
Los compuestos determinativos determinan un solo objeto natural mediante dos signos juntos, y no dos como en el caso del dvandva. Los ejemplos en espanol: pez gato, papel moneda.
(63) Such multiword units are similar to English copulative (dvandva) compounds such as bomber-fighter, which contain no semantic head acccording to Szymanek (1989: 51) and Bauer (1983: 31).
"The Sex-preferential Order of the Components in the Dvandva Compounds in Georgian." Gender: Language.
80), reflect a version of the sutra mentioning upadanaskandha only twice, i.e., at the beginning (after rupa) and at the end (after vijnana) of the list, the items vedana, sanjna, samskara, and vijnana being very likely to form a dvandva compound.
Bauer (2008) begins his discussion by pointing out that the coordinated compounds to be labeled with the term "dvandva" are much more limited than generally assumed.
Finally, the great commentator Nagojibhatta suggested that Katyayana's formulation implied a critique of Panini: avaradinam was grammatically more correct than purvadinam, because of Panini's ride II 2 33 [30 purvam 32 dvandve] aj-ady-ad-antam "Tn a dvandva compound the word beginning with a vowel and ending in a short/a/precedes." avara begins with a vowel, purva and para do not.
Even if it is to be taken as a dvandva, the term manussa is likely to refer to other non-monastics, since there is a range of more specific terms for monastics.
152), the author quotes an-ki-a as an example in which the locative after the noun an (*an-na = [an-a]) has been deleted, and translates "in heaven (and) on earth." However, an-ki seems to belong to the group of N+N compounds, specifically to the compound called "dvandva" (Schretter 2000: 934-35), and therefore the locative is not expected after the first noun.
The close connection between the two terms further follows from the dvandva compound urvasthiva-, which contains the stem [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
That is, avyay[bar{i}]bh[bar{a}]va, tatpurusa, bahuvr[bar{i}]hi, and dvandva compounds are described by some in terms of semantics, such that they are respectively compounds whose principal meaning is that of the prior term, the last term, neither term, and both terms.
The improbable construction of yatna-dharma into a tatpurusa (in addition to a dvandva) compound in a double attempt to link the two primary themes of the study strikes one as a bit of idle legerdemain, out of tune with what constitutes, on the whole, an impressive study.
Section 5 contains subsections on the forms of the names: names with one component (5.1), two components (5.2), divided into types of compounds according to the Indie classification (5.2.1, 5.2.2); then names containing a substantive plus a verbal noun (5.2.3); (2) dvandvas (5.2.4), e.g., Sad-farrox 'happy (and) fortunate'; names made by inversion (5.2.5), e.g, the "inverse bahuvrihi" A[gamma]at-farn '(to whom) fortune has come' (see on no.