Dynamometry


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Dynamometry

 

measurement of the strength of separate human muscle groups with the aid of special devices called medical dynamometers. Hand dynamometers are used to measure the strength of the muscles that flex the fingers, a posture dynamometer is used to measure the strength of the muscles that hold the body erect (“posture” strength), and so on. Dynamometric indexes can be expressed in absolute values (kilograms-force) and in relative values, for example, with respect to the mass (weight) of the human body. The data of dynamometry are used in anthropometry, in the selection of a trade, in the physiology and hygiene of labor and sports, and in medicine. They are also used as an additional factor in evaluating the degree of human physical development.

REFERENCE

Bashkirov, P. N. Uchenie o fizicheskom razvitii cheloveka. Moscow, 1962.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results found with average difference variables in the current study are similar to that found in other studies assessing left-right leg imbalance reliability through single leg hops (Hopper et al., 2002, Reid et al., 2007) and isokinetic dynamometry (Impellizzeri et al., 2008).
Mean, standard deviation and correlation per gender of isometric lumbar extension dynamometry results, Rio Grande do Sul, 2017 (n=47).
Another aspect to be considered is that the knee isokinetic dynamometry was performed immediately after KT removal (not during its use), which could have affected our results.
The tests with the highest number of very low results for the total population were those of dynamometry and the horizontal jump with 57.1 and 52.4%, respectively.
Toyka, "Comparison of maximal voluntary isometric contraction and Drachman's hand-held dynamometry in evaluating patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis," Muscle & Nerve, vol.
Jakobsen, "A comparative study of isokinetic dynamometry and manual muscle testing of ankle dorsal and plantar flexors and knee extensors and flexors," European Neurology, vol.
Fixed dynamometry is more sensitive than vital capacity or ALS rating scale.
KEY WORDS: Anthropometry; Dynamometry; Harpendence Caliper; Handgrip Strength; Percentage of Body Fat; Percentage of Lean Body Mass
Thus, we conclude that researchers in the area of physical exercise and health and the Brazilian Army can benefit from the results of this study not only to estimate strength from simple morphological characteristics, but also to include anthropometric measures and body composition in prediction models of muscular strength that consider other parameters of dynamometry or to establish values of relative strength.