tardive dyskinesia

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tardive dyskinesia

[′tär·div ‚dis·kə′nē·zhə]
(medicine)
A movement disorder marked by involuntary twitching of the mouth, lips, tongue, arms, legs, or trunk; frequently associated with the use of neuroleptic drugs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the thirty patients, LV aneurysm was defined as dyskinetic in 18 patients (dyskinetic group) and akinetic in 12 patients (akinetic group) by ventriculography.
The fact that the patient used olanzapine (10 mg/ day) for approximately 2 years, described no abnormal, involuntary movement during this time period, and that dyskinetic movements in the mouth region started in the weeks following the discontinuation of medication supports WE-D.
The patients were separated into two groups according to CP types; spastic (group 1, n=52) and ataxic, dyskinetic and mixed (group 2, n=35).
His routine was to revert to carbidopa/levodopa 25/250 in large amounts, become severely dyskinetic with severe postural hypotension, and then come into the clinic when he could find a fide.
Moreover, graft placement may be another risk factor; indeed, in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats previously made dyskinetic by L-DOPA treatment, grafts placed in the caudal striatum, but not in the rostral striatum, significantly reduced L-DOPA-induced limb and orolingual dyskinesia but produced also more severe GID in response to amphetamine [28].
The diagnosis of tardive blepharospasm is made on the basis of symptoms that develop during or within three months of the discontinuation of treatment with dopamine antagonists and a negative family history of dyskinetic blinking, blepharospasm, or other dystonias.
Guerrini, "Corpus callosum agenesis, severe mental retardation, epilepsy, and dyskinetic quadriparesis due to a novel mutation in the homeodomain of ARX," American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A, vol.
Movement disorders often require consultation with a neurologist, and a working knowledge of established and novel treatments can set the stage for optimal long-term cooperative management} In this article, we review therapeutic options for common movement disorders, including hypokinetic, hyperkinetic, and dyskinetic disturbances.
Dyskinetic cilia result in secretion retention, with consequent pulmonary complications.
K becomes dyskinetic on the smallest dose of carbidopa/levodopa (Sinemet).