E


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E

, letter of the alphabet
E, fifth letter of the alphabet. It is a usual symbol for a mid-front vowel, such as ĕ in the English step. A mid-front vowel was represented by Greek epsilon [Gr.,=e without the aspirate], to which E corresponds in form and place (see also H). English ē is pronounced as a diphthong of ĭ and y. In musical notation E represents a note in the scale.

e

, in mathematics
e, in mathematics, irrational number occurring widely in mathematics and science, approximately equal to the value 2.71828; it is the base of natural, or Naperian, logarithms. The number e is defined as the limit of the expression (1+1/n)n as n becomes infinitely large, or In 1873 the French mathematician C. Hermite proved that e was transcendental, i.e., not a root of any algebraic equation; this proof constituted a great contribution to the growth of mathematics. The number e is also known as Euler's number, for Leonhard Euler, who discovered the famous formula eiπ=−1, where i= √−1, thus expressing the relationship between the numbers e, i, and π. The exponential function ex, often written exp(x), occurs in various applications ranging from statistics to nuclear physics.

Bibliography

See study by E. Maor (1994).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

E

 

(in Russian, Napier number), the limit of the expression [1 + (1/n)]n as n increases without bound:

It is the base of the natural system of logarithms. The number e is a transcendental number; this fact was first proved in 1873 by C. Hermite. Naming the number e after J. Napier is not entirely valid. (See.)

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

e

(mathematics)
The base of the natural logarithms; the number defined by the equation approximately equal to 2.71828.

E

(electricity)
(science and technology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

class A, B, C, D, E, F

A classification applied to fire doors, fire windows, roof coverings, interior finishes, places of assembly, etc., to indicate gradations of fire safety. See fire-endurance, fire-door rating.

E

Symbol for “90° elbow.”
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

E

(1)
An extension of C++ with database types and persistent objects. E is a powerful and flexible procedural programming language. It is used in the Exodus database system.

See also GNU E.

ftp://ftp.cs.wisc.edu/exodus/E/.

["Persistence in the E Language: Issues and Implementation", J.E. Richardson et al, Soft Prac & Exp 19(12):1115-1150 (Dec 1989)].

E

(language)
A procedural language by Wouter van Oortmerssen with semantics similar to C. E features lists, low-level polymorphism, exception handling, quoted expressions, pattern matching and object inheritance. Amiga E is a version for the Amiga.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

E

(1) See exponent.

(2) (Electronic) "E" with or without the hyphen (e or e-) is used as a word prefix in order to connote the electronic or Internet version of a physical object or activity. For example, mail becomes email or e-mail; a book becomes an ebook or e-book, etc.

(3) A set of object-oriented extensions for Java and Common Lisp introduced in 1997 by Electric Communities. Inspired by the Joule and Original-E languages, E was designed to create secure distributed computing applications. Messages are sent to remote objects in "vats," which processes the messages in the order they are received.
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