E Pluribus Unum


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E Pluribus Unum

(ē plo͝or`ĭbəs yo͞o`nəm) [Lat.,=one made out of many], motto on the Great Seal of the United States and on many U.S. coins. Although selected in 1776 by Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson for the Continental Congress, it was not officially adopted as a national motto until six years later.

e pluribus unum

motto of the U.S.: Latin ’one out of many.’ [Am. Culture: RHD, 481]
See: America
References in periodicals archive ?
"E Pluribus Unum: Diversity and Community in the Twenty-First Century." Scandinavian Political Studies, 2007, 30(2), 137-174.
Haines Road Cut and E Pluribus Unum deposits were investigated as part of the Juneau district study.
It reads, "E Pluribus Unum" - Latin for "Out of Many, One."
The motto on the actual seal reads E pluribus unum, Latin for "Out of many, one." How does this parody refer to a current event?
Additional inscriptions are UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 1919, 2019, and E PLURIBUS UNUM.
The temporary cans even feature our late great national motto, "E PLURIBUS UNUM."
The 1782 Great Seal of the United States, however, includes several Latin phrases, among them E Pluribus Unum ("Out of Many, One") and Novus Ordo Seclorum ("A New Order of the Ages").
Especially at this time of year, Americans of all religious, ethnic and social stripes are mindful of their nation's cultural richness and traditional toleration of diversity - bedrock virtues enshrined in our national motto: E pluribus unum, "out of many, one."
One Out Of Many is another US motto and is a translation from the Latin E Pluribus Unum. It has appeared on the Great Seal since 1782.
But it is not a translation from Latin - One Out Of Many is another US motto translated from "E Pluribus Unum".
While one might perceive this as benevolent despotism, it did not prevent her from structuring a festival that epitomized the American slogan, E pluribus unum, and set a substantial pattern for future events.