e-lancer

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e-lancer

(Electronic-freeLANCER) A person who works online for a variety of organizations. For example, an e-lancer may be a copy editor and all transactions are conducted via email and attachments.
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Khurram Dastgir said that Ministry of Commerce will keep apace with the development in the trade technologies and will provide appropriate forum for business to the enterprising young e-lancers.
These e-lancers are facing great difficulties in bringing their payments back into Pakistan which is the primary hurdle in exploring the potential increase in this field.
The event, which targets tech entrepreneurs, policy-makers and e-lancers, will also include an Expo open to the general public, allowing a broader audience to interact with startups from Pakistan, and join free breakout sessions to learn about coding, freelancing, developing apps, using social media for marketing and much more.
The event which targets tech entrepreneurs, policy makers and e-lancers, will also include an Expo open to the general public allowing a broader audience to interact with start-ups from Pakistan, and join free breakout sessions to learn about coding, freelancing, developing apps, using social media for marketing and much more.
In Newsplex, reporters and editors might learn how to communicate via video conference calls and online story budgets or see how "e-lancers" can be dispatched to a breaking news story where they will provide written news alerts, sound bites and video clips.
What is the motivation for professionals to become e-lancers?
Malone and Laubacher propose that the temporary company (or team) and the fluid network in which e-lancers thrive may become the dominant business organization of the future, displacing large, centrally managed company organizations.
Malone and Laubacher postulate that larger organizations will continue to contract out ongoing routine operations to smaller ones, but that a shift to e-lancers will increase as companies contract out shorter-term projects to temporary teams that may sometimes exist for no more than a day or two.
One could argue that these are special cases and that they don't necessarily create an environment that encourages e-lancers. After all, the digital infrastructure that is essential to the e-lance economy was not even in place in the 1950s when the movie industry was making its transition to the temporary company model.
A Web site on the Internet can serve as an online brochure and resume, making it easy for e-lancers to provide information about their services and experience 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year.
They're becoming self-employed knowledge workers, proprietors of home-based businesses, temps and permatemps, freelancers and e-lancers, independent contractors and independent professionals, micropreneurs and infopreneurs, part-time consultants, interim executives, on-call troubleshooters, and full-time soloists.
They are the soloists, the e-lancers, the freelancers, and the independents, and at about 25 million in the U.S.