e-mail spoofing

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e-mail spoofing

The unauthorized use of a third-party domain name as the sender's name in an e-mail message. Most often used by spammers, spoofing the name of a popular retailer or organization entices the recipient to read the full message. See e-mail authentication, spoofing and spam.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Historic Jones Beach Water Tower being refurbished despite e-mail hoax saying it was demolished [Newsday]
Ericsson considers the e-mail hoax to be an attack on its network resources.
Thank you for tackling the infamous "Johns Hopkins" e-mail hoax in your November/December 2005 issue article, "Dissecting an Internet Hoax: Water, Food, Plastics, and Microwaves." Iterations of this hoax have circulated the Internet for years, spreading misinformation about the release of dioxins and phthalates into food.
* Don't clog bandwidth and mailboxes by forwarding virus warnings, medical horror stories, or dire predictions without first visiting a couple of e-mail hoax identification Web sites to check if they are genuine.
Hundreds of bubbly lovers, including high-profile TV personalties, fell victim to the e-mail hoax.
This column will be present two topics: how to sort out an Internet/ e-mail hoax using the case study, and briefly review the science of the environmental component contained in the e-mail.
Your e-mail inbox might contain more ordinary spam or scams than hoaxes, but sending on just one e-mail hoax has an extreme self-perpetuating effect on the Internet.
Dr Al Mousawi would not directly comment on the 'evil design' theory, but said such e-mail hoaxes were commonplace.
A free monthly newsletter alerts subscribers to the latest e-mail hoaxes and Internet scams.
Department of Energy's HoaxBusters (http://www.hoax busters.ciac.org), Vmyths.com (http://www .vmyths.com), and Common E-mail Hoaxes (http://www.3oddballz.com/hoaxes).
If you are interested in e-mail hoaxes, scams or urban legends, there are Internet sites that are useful to those of us trying to keep Zippy from increasing the amount of junk e-mail traffic clogging the Internet.
Deaths caused by insufficient medical information, e-mail hoaxes that bilk compassionate consumers, Web sites that are not what they appear, hackers who invade and destroy corporate databases, and graphic manipulation that warps reality provide solid evidence of these dangers.