E911


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E911

(Enhanced 911) The 911 emergency service on cellular and Internet telephone calls (VoIP). In 1996, the FCC mandated a two-phase implementation for cellphone carriers to be completed by the end of 2005. Phase I required that carriers provide the telephone number and location of the cell tower that took the 911 call to the Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP). Phase II required that the carrier be able to triangulate the call to within 100 meters for the majority of calls. In 1999, the FCC added assisted GPS (AGPS) cellphones as an alternate solution with accuracy of 50 meters for the majority of calls.

In 2005, the E911 service requirement was mandated for voice over IP (VoIP) providers. See mobile positioning, triangulation and VoIP.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The tax is collected by the Department of Revenue and, after holding back a 1% administrative fee, DOR sends 25-cents to the State E911 general fund and 70-cents to the county in which it was collected.
The need to finance NG911 services is complicated by the need to address state E911 funding policies that may not fit smoothly into a revised federal-state NG911 funding arrangement.
With Teo's E911 solution, we've substantially enhanced our ability to effectively and safely handle emergency situations.'
In fact, Patrick Halley, the National Emergency Number Association's director of governmental affairs, was the only E911 Forum panelist who thought that the FCC's standards were attainable.
She said each community determines whether a police or fire department or dispatch center will take the E911 calls.
For example, with Vonage, which is facing legal battles accusing it of misleading customers about the limitations of its E911 capabilities, VoIP customers must provide it with their new location when they move or travel.
David Koon, a New York state assemblyman, has supported statewide efforts to appropriate money for implementing E911 technology.
lie believes that while the GSM operators settled for less accurate network positioning solutions in order to meet FCC E911 requirements, they better not wait much longer to mandate GPS in the handset, or they'll find themselves "lost" as far as location-based services are concerned.
Implementation of wireless E911 is several years away in many states, raising the prospect of piecemeal availability of this service across the country for an indefinite number of years to come.
Oregon now faces implementation costs for the second phase of E911 technology: pinpointing and mapping the location of callers using cellular phones.
In the E911 Phase II rules, the FCC has defined a health and safety service motivated by the capability to accurately locate a mobile user in an emergency situation, such as a car accident or major natural or manmade disaster.
The OMNI-COMM Gold E911 Simulator is a computer-based, multi-line telephone simulator.