EBCDIC


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EBCDIC

[′eb·sə‚dik]
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

EBCDIC

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

EBCDIC

(Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code) Pronounced "eb-suh-dick." The binary code for text as well as communications and printer control from IBM. This data code originated with the System/360 and is still used in IBM mainframes and most IBM midrange computers. It is an 8-bit code (256 combinations) that stores one alphanumeric character or two decimal digits in a byte.

EBCDIC and ASCII are the two codes most widely used to represent data. See EBCDIC chart.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The name of the output file was included and the end of encoded data indicated by a line containing the word "end." Some encoding programs also placed a character table at the start of the file to help fix problems introduced by ASCII to EBCDIC translations.
It's line-compatible with Bell 208B modems, supports point-to-point synchronous applications, and can accommodate either the ASCII or EBCDIC character codes on a switch-selectable basis.
The unit also handles startup tests and Fox message transmission in Baudot, EBCD, ASCII and EBCDIC codes with simultaneous parity-error analysis on received data.
The DataTest 5 performs frame-level decoding for HDLC and SDLC and handles ASCII, EBCDIC, EBCD, Baudot, Ipars and Hex codes.
The custom software the vendor added to its Tele-Times system software allows the microcomputer to perform the basic call-accounting functions of collecting, pricing and sorting calls, as well as exptracting and preparing the records for further processing, first in a Wang VS100 minicomputer to make the conversion from ASCII to EBCDIC, then into the IBM mainframe for the telecomunications billing system.
Currently the switch is supporting Baudot, ASCII and EBCDIC terminals with asynchronous, bysinc, X.25 and SDLC protocols at speeds to 9.6 kb/s.
Typically, such converters translate the code from ASCII to EBCDIC and the protocol from asynchronous to bisynchronous or SDLC.
Protocol converters became hot items in 1983 for two reasons: they can reduce the cost of a network by substituting standard asynchronous ASCII terminals, and especially printers, for more-expensive synchronous EBCDIC (extended binary-coded decimal exchange) devices; and their bridging and switching functions allow one communications network to interconnect different types of computers (sync and async) and to serve both with only one terminal per workstation.