Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

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Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

(EEOC), U.S. agency created in 1964 to end discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in employment and to promote programs to make equal employment opportunity a reality. It has since become responsible for ending discrimination based on age or disability. The commission receives charges of discrimination, investigates, and if they appear true, attempts to remedy them through conciliation. If conciliation is not secured, the commission may bring suit in federal court. During the Reagan and Bush administrations (1981–93) it was criticized for shifting from blanket to individual complaints, for permitting no retroactive application of the Civil Rights Law of 1991, and for letting thousands of age discrimination cases lapse. In 1996 it began the mediation-based alternative dispute resolution program to help it resolve charges faster. The commision handles 75,000 to 80,000 charges annually.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

U.S. government agency appointed to promote the cause of equal opportunity for all U.S. citizens. [Am. Hist.: Payton, 224]
References in periodicals archive ?
The EEOC is more in control of the process now," Hartstein further explained.
Bush administration, the EEOC largely ignored how and when background checks were applied by companies.
The EEOC for years has declared the "settled principle" that federal employment discrimination statutes cover undocumented workers, and the memorandum of understanding reinforces this protection.
48) Yet, the EEOC proceeded to a bench trial, arguing that JBS could not claim undue hardship because of accommodations it had implemented subsequent to the dispute.
In one suit, the EEOC alleges that the employer disproportionately screened out workers from jobs using a hiring policy that denied employment to workers with certain convictions dating back any number of years.
DeGroff says companies can avoid being targeted by the EEOC by a rigorous process of self-auditing.
The EEOC guidance offers concrete boundaries regarding the health-related steps employers can take to protect the workplace.
Recommendation: If pilot projects are approved by EEOC, the Acting Chairman of EEOC should direct pilot project officials to develop for each pilot project an evaluation plan that includes key features to improve the likelihood that pilot project evaluations will yield sound results, such as (1) well-defined, clear, and measurable objectives; measures that are directly linked to the program objectives; criteria for determining pilot program performance; (2) a way to isolate the effects of the pilot programs; (3) a data analysis plan for the evaluation design; and (4) a detailed plan to ensure that data collection, entry, and storage are reliable and error free.
Both labor unions and employers complained to the EEOC that compliance with the decision would force companies to reduce or eliminate current retiree health benefits.
The EEOC filed the suit in January 2004, claiming that Wal-Mart violated the Americans with Disabilities Act when it refused to hire a man who has cerebral palsy.
She also served as an attorney advisor at the EEOC during the mid-1980s.