EIRP


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eirp

McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

EIRP

(Equivalent [or] Effective Isotropically Radiated Power) A measurement of the amount of power emitted by an antenna. In a locality, the EIRP of antennas are taken into account in order to avoid interference on the same frequency.
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References in periodicals archive ?
EIRP = [[|E(v / m)|[.sup.2]4[pi](3m)[.sup.2]]/[377[OMEGA]]] = 0.3|E(v / m)|[.sup.2]
In here, effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) is the effective transmission power radiated at the transmitter considering transmission power antenna gain, and [G.sub.r] is reception power antenna gain for received signal.
Electric-field strength simulations are executed for a dipole EIRP (Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power) of 20 dBm and at distances between 3.5 and 50 cm from the dipole.
The FCC requires the U-NII device to operate at least 6 dB below the mean equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) value of 30 dBm.
In this stage, the characteristics imposed as main parameters for the design include operating frequency, radiation pattern, polarization, configuration, minimum required efficiency, EIRP and linearity.
Considering the relationship between the equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) and the power received by an isotropic antenna, it is possible to estimate the power density at the receiving point in scenarios that follow LOS COST-WI model, as (see Appendix)
Also, because of recent FCC regulations that severely limit the effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) per unit bandwidth of a UWB DUT, the available power in the far field is small.
Since the effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) is limited in the ISM bands, [7] an efficient use of the total radiated power with respect to the information-bearing signal is important to obtain long transmission distances.
where [P.sub.t][G.sub.t] = EIRP is the regulated isotropically radiated power (3.28 W in Europe).
Considering the typical EIRP (about 33dBm) and wall penetration loss (about 16 dB), we compute some [d.sub.WiMax](m) for I (dBm) under different WiMax propagation environments.
Consider the case of an emission limit of -63.3-dBm equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) at 1,000 MHz.
However, higher effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) is obtained from this MBPA by driving each element with equal and maximum available power.