EKG


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electrocardiography

electrocardiography (ĭlĕkˌtrōkärdēŏgˈrəfē), science of recording and interpreting the electrical activity that precedes and is a measure of the action of heart muscles. Since 1887, when Augustus Waller demonstrated the possibility of measuring such action, physicians and physiologists have recorded it in order to study the heart's normal behavior and to provide a method for diagnosing abnormalities. Electrical current associated with contraction of the heart muscles passes through the various tissues and reaches the surface of the body. What is actually recorded is the change in electrical potential on the body surface. The first practical device for recording the activity of the heart was the string galvanometer developed by William Einthoven in 1903. In this device a fine quartz string is suspended vertically between the poles of a magnet. The string is deflected in response to changes in electrical potential and its movement can be optically enlarged and photographed, or, if an immediately visible record is desired, the string's movement can be recorded on a sheet of paper. A more sophisticated form of the electrocardiograph employs a vacuum-tube amplifier. The greatly amplified current from the body deflects a mirror galvanometer that causes a beam of light to move across a light-sensitive film. When an electrocardiograph is taken, electrodes (leads) are attached to the extremities and to the left chest. The recordings obtained in this manner are called electrocardiograms, or more simply EKG's or ECG's. A normal EKG shows a sequence of three waves arbitrarily labeled P, QRS, and T. The P wave is a small, low-amplitude wave produced by the excitation of the atria of the heart. It is followed by a resting interval that marks the passage of electrical impulses into the ventricles. Following this interval comes the QRS wave, a rapid, high-amplitude wave marking ventricular excitation, and then a slow-building T wave denoting ventricular recovery. Abnormalities may be noted from deviation in wave form, height, direction, or duration. The type of abnormal wave may sometimes indicate the type of heart disorder. Usually the physician must associate the EKG with other clinical observations to determine the cause of the abnormality. See also stress test.
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EKG

(medicine)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers then tested the AI on normal-rhythm EKGs from a group of 36,280 patients, of whom 3,051 were known to have atrial fibrillation.
He points out that 'doctors should understand the initial changes (in a patient's EKG reading) and how it can progress to more serious cardiac abnormalities.'
The addition of imaging helps diagnose CAD in situations where an EKG alone is less likely to be accurate; for example, in patients who take digoxin, and in women.
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On Thursday, (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-12-21/apple-is-said-to-develop-ekg-heart-monitor-for-future-watch) Bloomberg reported that the Cupertino giant is currently testing the use of Apple Watch as an EKG. The publication indicated that internal prototypes for a future model are being tested at present, so it's safe to assume that Apple could be doing this with the Apple Watch Series 4 in mind. 
When SmartRhythm detects that heart rate and activity are out of sync, the device notifies users to capture an EKG with KardiaBand, or with KardiaMobile, its popular, portable EKG reader.
If the watch's native heart rate monitor detects an abnormality, KardiaBand's app will prompt the user to take an EKG reading.
Although the book, overall, is easy to follow and organized by chapter in a simple-to-complex approach, it includes many pages that are somewhat busy-looking, with figures, lists, tables, and EKG tracings; however, these are easily understandable.
An EKG was repeated one month later afterresolutionofhis sepsis(Figure2).
There are many resources for critical care nurses to learn how to interpret 12-lead electrocardiograms (EKG), and Goldsworthy seeks a middle ground between flash cards and dense tomes.
AFTER COMPLAINING OF CHEST PAIN, a 37-year-old man underwent an electrocardiogram (EKG) examination.