ELIZA effect


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ELIZA effect

(jargon)
/e-li:'z* *-fekt'/ (From ELIZA) The tendency of humans to attach associations to terms from prior experience. For example, there is nothing magic about the symbol "+" that makes it well-suited to indicate addition; it's just that people associate it with addition. Using "+" or "plus" to mean addition in a computer language is taking advantage of the ELIZA effect.

The ELIZA effect is a Good Thing when writing a programming language, but it can blind you to serious shortcomings when analysing an Artificial Intelligence system.

Compare ad-hockery; see also AI-complete.
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References in periodicals archive ?
One phenomenon that feeds the illusion of AI supercompetence is called the Eliza effect, which emerged from an MIT study in 1966.
Nowadays, the Eliza effect makes people feel that AI Is generally competent, when in fact it's only narrowly so.