ELSIE


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ELSIE

(language)
A distributed version of ELLIS.

["Using Object-Oriented Mechanisms to Describe Linda", P. Broadbery <pab@maths.bath.ac.uk> et al, in "Linda-Like Systems and Their Implementati"on, G. Wilson ed, U Edinburgh TR 91-13, 1991].
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References in classic literature ?
There was once a man who had a daughter who was called Clever Elsie. And when she had grown up her father said: 'We will get her married.'
'Yes,' said the mother, 'if only someone would come who would have her.' At length a man came from a distance and wooed her, who was called Hans; but he stipulated that Clever Elsie should be really smart.
Then Clever Elsie began to weep and said: 'If I get Hans, and we have a child, and he grows big, and we send him into the cellar here to draw beer, then the pick-axe will fall on his head and kill him.' Then she sat and wept and screamed with all the strength of her body, over the misfortune which lay before her.
If I get Hans, and we have a child, and he grows big, and has to draw beer here, the pick-axe will perhaps fall on his head, and kill him.' Then said the maid: 'What a clever Elsie we have!' and sat down beside her and began loudly to weep over the misfortune.
If I get Hans, and we have a child, and he grows big, and has to draw beer here, the pick-axe will fall on his head and kill him.' Then said the boy: 'What a clever Elsie we have!' and sat down by her, and likewise began to howl loudly.
"She was very straight about it, was Elsie. I can't say that she did not give me every chance of getting out of it if I wished to do so.
I showed it to Elsie, and down she dropped in a dead faint.
Who would have hurt little Elsie. I may have threatened her--God forgive me!--but I would not have touched a hair of her pretty head.
"If Elsie dies, I care nothing what becomes of me," said the American.
It's a young woman, a Miss Elsie--yes, a Miss Elsie Leeson.
`Once upon a time there were three little sisters,' the Dormouse began in a great hurry; `and their names were Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie; and they lived at the bottom of a well--'
"And did he not speak of me, Heyward?" demanded Alice, with jealous affection; "surely, he forgot not altogether his little Elsie?"