lidocaine

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lidocaine

[′līd·ə‚kān]
(organic chemistry)
C14H22N2O A crystalline compound, used as a local anesthetic. Also known as lignocaine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The results of this research indicate that pain management through the application of EMLA cream or music listening intervention has similar effects in alleviating pain experienced by paediatric subjects who were infants aged between 2 to 24 months old.
In the EMLA group, research subjects received 2 ml of EMLA cream containing a mixture of 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine in oil/water emulsion and further covered by clear dressing for 45-60 minutes.
Lysakowski et al., evaluated lidocaine dose- response, of the J-tip injector for pain relief associated with the insertion of 18-gauge cannula into dorsum of the hand and they found that, a total dose of 0.5 ml of 2% lidocaine produced significantly greater analgesia compared to 1% lidocaine.20 In the study by Jimenez et al, the efficacy of J-Tip and EMLA in reducing pain during IV cannulation and placement was compared.
The EMLA participated in the editing of Estonian version of the International library statistics standard (ISO 2789: 2013) "Information and Documentation".
EMLA application was limited to children requiring needle puncture of intact skin for phlebotomy procedures.
About one third of responders reported topical anaesthetic was unavailable to them, although EMLA is available for purchase without a prescription in New Zealand.
Lidocaine-prilocaine (EMLA) cream as analgesia for hysterosalpingography: a prospective, randomized, controlled, double blinded study.
In the preoperative room, pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded and Eutectic mixture of local anaesthetics (EMLA) was applied at the dorsum of the hand to prevent pain from the insertion of intravenous cannula.
Good results have been obtained in the reduction of chronic pain after breast surgery with perioperative administration of venlafaxine, mexiletine with gabapentin, a eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA), and a combined treatment with EMLA and gabapentin [14].
These include vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) [3], aspirin [4], and eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA; a mix of lidocaine and prilocaine) [5].
Taddio and Nulman (1994) conducted a trial with a Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA) (local anaesthetic cream) with infants who received diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis injections.