ENIAC


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

ENIAC

[′ē·nē·ak]
(computer science)
The first digital computer in the modern sense of the word, built 1942-1945. Derived from Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator.

ENIAC

ENIAC

(Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer) The first operational electronic digital computer developed for the U.S. Army by J. Presper Eckert and John Mauchly at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Started in 1943, it took 200,000 man-hours and nearly a half million dollars to complete two years later.

Programmed by plugging in cords and setting thousands of switches, the decimal-based machine used 18,000 vacuum tubes, weighed 30 tons and took up 1,800 square feet. It cost a fortune in electricity to run; however, at 5,000 additions per second, it was faster than anything else. Initially targeted for trajectory calculations, by the time it was ready to go, World War II had ended. Soon after, it was moved to the army's Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland where it was put to good work computing thermonuclear reactions in hydrogen bombs and numerous other problems until it was dismantled in 1955.

An Amazing Machine in 1946
Referring to ENIAC's public introduction in early 1946, The New York Times said "One of the war's top secrets, an amazing machine which applies electronic speeds for the first time to mathematical tasks hitherto too difficult and cumbersome for solution, was announced here tonight." Today, all 1,800 square feet of that machinery fits on the head of a pin.

ENIAC proved that the thinking behind electronic computing was sound, and smaller and faster machines were forecast at the dedication ceremony. However, it is doubtful they would have conceived that the entire CPU would be no bigger than a pencil eraser some day. See EDVAC and early computers.


The First Operational Digital Computer
Looking a little like a dungeon in an old science fiction movie, this must have been an awesome sight in 1946. The electrical power used could supply thousands of computers today. (Image courtesy of The Computer History Museum, www.computerhistory.org)







Would They Have Believed It?
Anyone watching an ENIAC demonstration could never have envisioned computers would become so small, you could lose one in your shirt pocket. Not only that, these PICmicro microcontrollers from Microchip (www.microchip.com), are a whole lot faster than the ENIAC.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ENIAC Joint Undertaking (JU) is a public-private partnership on nanoelectronics bringing together the ENIAC member States, the European Union, and AENEAS (an association representing European R&D actors).
Andreas Wild, ENIAC JU Executive Director, said: "IMPROVE and LENS have been selected in the open and competitive call for proposals from 2008, and came to completion this year.
Andreas Wild, Executive Director of the ENIAC JU, said: "In 2012, the ENIAC JU establishes itself as an instrument of choice in implementing KET policies in nanoelectronics.
It was named for John Presper Eckert and John William Mauchly, who collaborated on the design and construction of the first large scale electronic computing machine, known as ENIAC - the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer, in 1947.
Penn's acclaimed schools include Wharton, the nation's first collegiate business school, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science where the world's first electronic, large scale, general-purpose computer, ENIAC, was invented and activated.
The objective of the ENIAC JU project PROMINENT is to demonstrate significant cost reduction in MEMS manufacturing by using printing technologies to reduce materials, chemicals and energy consumption, waste water production, processing cycle time and capital investments.
The introduction of software products for the first time in the late 1950s is as significant an event as the introduction of the ENIAC in the mid 1940s.
Objective: The SeNaTe project is the next in a chain of thematically connected ENIAC JU KET pilot line projects which are associated with 450mm/300mm development for the 12nm and 10nm technology nodes.
He details the development of the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer ENIAC in 1942.
Inducted into the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame along with other ENIAC women programmers, Jean received many awards and honors for her life achievements in computer science.
Jean Jennings Bartik (December 27, 1924 - March 23, 2011) was one of the original programmers for the ENIAC computer.
She begins by introducing the ENIAC project and its contributors, then steps back to her own childhood and path to computing.