Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment

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Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment

[′īn‚stīn pə′däl·skē ′rōz·ənik‚sper·ə·mənt]
(quantum mechanics)
A Gedanken experiment which was introduced to argue that quantum mechanics is not a complete theory, involving polarization measurements on two photons emitted in opposite directions in an atomic cascade. Abbreviated EPR experiment.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are reasonable discussions of some aspects of physics, such as his introduction to Bell's inequality and the EPR paradox, but most are cursory and some even suggest misconceptions.
Another well-known paradox was that of Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen [2] commonly referred to as the EPR paradox.
Regrettably, there are few known experiments that demonstrate whither the macroscopic question, unlike with the EPR paradox.
From then on the focus is on the theory of measurement, the EPR paradox, and on technological applications such as cryptology, quantum factoring and ion-trap quantum computers.
Albert Einstein famously derided this classical analogy as "spooky action at a distance" and, along with Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen, posed what is known as the EPR Paradox in a 1935 paper that argued that something was missing from quantum theory.
Several theoretical approaches have been proposed to dispel the EPR Paradox, and the 2001 approach described by collaborating researchers Luming Duan at the University of Science and Technology of China, Mikhail Lukin at Harvard University, and Juan Ignacio Cirac and Peter Zoller of the Universitat Innsbruck (known as the DLCZ Protocol) has been demonstrated experimentally by Professor H.
Consider, for example, the mind-boggling EPR paradox.
In its simplest form, the EPR paradox imagines a quantum reaction that sends two identical particles, A and B, flying apart in opposite directions.
WEDNESDAY D-1 RESULTS - EPR Paradox 19, Wonder Wash 11.
The EPR paradox remained a curiosity until 1964 when John S.
The EPR paradox thus would seem to suggest that quantum mechanics and relativity cannot be made compatible, and so one or the other must go.
Now, on its 50th anniversary, the EPR paradox seems finally to have been "refuted," according to Mermin.