ERM


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ERM

ERM

(1) (Enterprise Relationship Management) An umbrella term with many shades of meaning over the years. It may refer to the management of information from any or all of an organization's customers, suppliers, business partners and employees. See CRM, ERP, sales force automation and supply chain management.

(2) (Enterprise Report Management) The management of voluminous reports in a large organization. Part of enterprise content management (ECM), ERM deals with the distribution of reports on optical media and hard drives. ERM was a name change from "Computer Output to LaserDisc" (see COLD). See ECM.
References in periodicals archive ?
Organizations address the problem because they have to; they determine that the risks (be they regulatory, financial, legal, or customer perception) are too high not to have a highly regimented and structured approach to centralized ERM.
It proved so successful ERM decided to expand operations in Wales and has already created 18 well paid jobs for graduates and experienced environmental consultants.
Unfortunately, while incorporating ERM into strategy is how it creates true value, not every organization has come to this realization.
To develop an ERM program, and to lead this effort, many companies turn to the actuarial profession due to its rigorous training in predictive modeling and the ability to forecast emerging risks.
In addition to categorizing where companies fit in this progression, the survey also documents how companies are shaping ERM programs as they work toward becoming trendsetters that use ERM to optimize business value.
The lowest branch on the tree, closest to the base, represents the earliest ERM efforts.
I have been involved with ERM since the early 1990s, and the level of interest in ERM has never been greater," reports Lam, whose hiring as chief risk officer at GE Finance in 1993 is often cited as the first-ever appointment to a CRO position.
Since ERM is committed to thoroughness, it is important to identify, and assess risk in a uniform fashion.
The global reach of today's companies, as well as the the rise in stakeholder scrutiny, makes the use of ERM a business imperative for companies that want to be sure critical risks are being managed across the enterprise.
That's how Emory started its ERM program, which identified more than 550 risks during the first risk assessment go-round.