embryonic stem cell

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embryonic stem cell

[‚em·brē¦än·ik ′stem ‚sel]
(embryology)
Undifferentiated cell derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst that can give rise to any of the three embryonic germ layers, and thus can form any cell or tissue type of the body, but cannot give rise to the full spectrum of cells required to complete fetal development.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using this cell line allows separation of 2-cell-like cells from the ES cells in the culture by collecting the green cells which have entered the 2-cell like state.
They were also able to reprogram mouse ES cells and iPS cells in the new condition and create EPSCs from these cells, turning back the development clock to the very earliest cell type.
However, even this debate is not uniform as while some oppose abortion and the use of human ES cells, others oppose abortion but support stem cell research using frozen embryos that remain after a woman or couple has completed infertility treatment, citing the "lesser of two evils" argument.
One ethical issue that is applied to ES Cells is also used against iPS cells, which is the scenario evocative of science fiction; although iPS cells don't come from embryos, a scientist could induce the infinitely versatile cells to form sperm and eggs, and they might even cross the gametes in a laboratory dish to study aspects of human genetics.
We could then compare reset human cells to genuine mouse ES cells, and indeed we found they shared many similarities.
ES cells are not suited to repairing damaged or diseased tissue.
8221; This newly-issued patent is the first among a portfolio of intellectual property of Xcelthera Inc covering PluriXcel human stem cell technology platform for large-scale production of high quality clinical-grade pluripotent human ES cell lines and their functional human neuronal and heart muscle cell therapy products.
Research on cloned ES cells became less active following the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, around 2006.
His new direction eventually took him back to Japan where, armed with the expertise gained at Gladstone, he undertook what seemed to be an impossible undertaking: to find out which genetic factors from among hundreds of possibilities instruct ES cells to become other types of cells.
Kamthorn Pruksananonda and coauthors from Chulalongkorn University and Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand, demonstrated that ES cells derived from frozen embryos have a similar ability to differentiate into multiple cell types-a characteristic known as pluripotency-as do ES cells derived from fresh embryos.
Like the cells of the early embryo, ES cells can differentiate into any cell type or tissue--a property termed pluripotency.
ES cells could not only provide the unique cell model for many issues of developmental biology and human diseases, but also provide promising sources for cell transplantation and gene therapy (Drukker, 2008).