EUVE


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EUVE

Abbrev. for Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mumma, an astronomer at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and a member of the EUVE team.
Cassinelli was able to view the star by pointing EUVE's telescopes through a hole in the obscuring interstellar fog.
The Berkeley group's new effort builds on the success of its Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) mission, which looked at energetic point sources.
Now, the Roentgen satellite (ROSAT) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spacecraft have provided new details of the sun's environment.
Relying on his backgrounds in theology and physics, Francois Euve of the Jesuit theological faculty at Centre Sevres in Paris offers an ambitious and rich work urging us to rethink the Christian theology of creation within the paradigm of play or game.
Mauche is one of the principal investigators in the cataclysmic-variable observing program for such satellites as the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), Astro 2, Voyager, and ASCA.
The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), launched last June, detects this band of radiation, which can't penetrate Earth's atmosphere and is intermediate in energy between the near ultraviolet and X-rays (SN: 5/23/92, p.344).
Soon thereafter the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) noted a surge of photons from neutral helium at 584 angstroms.
This observatory, known as the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), will probe nearby stars and interstellar gas from a vantage point 328 miles above Earth's surface.
These goals were achieved thanks to the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite, launched on June 7, 1992.