Eadred


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Eadred

died 955 ad, king of England (946--55): regained Northumbria (954) from the Norwegian king Eric Bloodaxe
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Eadred confined this disloyal cleric, not at a church manor, but at a fortress which would be a royal possession.
Would Eadred of Wessex really send his treasonable archbishop so far away?
Similar names (Eadwine, Eadweard, Eadmund, Eadgar, Eadred, and Eadhild) are attested among members of the West Saxon royal family during this period.(70) To judge from both onomastics and geography, these are "our" people as opposed to the foreign AEtlas and Caelics, the exotic Glommas and Woingas and Hundingas (Dogmen, or Cynocephali, apparently) that figure elsewhere in the poem.
We do not know for sure where Lindisfarne was when; it is generally assumed without discussion that it never actually left Northumbria.(33) But the Northumbrian wars of the mid-tenth century make it possible that it was taken south to safety from the Danes of Olaf Sihtricson in 949, or as a pledge or some kind of goodwill token when Eadred harried Northumbria (daring even to burn Ripon minster, which must have sounded a warning to senior clerics throughout the north) in 948 or took the crown of Northumbria in 954.(34) There is certainly no reason why, in the calmer days after 954 (and especially after 959), it should not have been allowed south in the interests of scholarship.
Harold Gough reconstructs the tenth-century archiepiscopal estate at Reculver from the bounds attached to S546, a charter in the name of King Eadred ostensibly drawn up by Dunstan as abbot of Glastonbury in 949.
first `king of the English' and AEthelstan's brothers, Edmund and Eadred, consolidated his work.
aeEthelstan's brothers, Edmund I and Eadred, still had to defend their position against their Viking rivals in the 940s and 950s.