Lower Cretaceous

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Lower Cretaceous

[′lō·ər krə′tā·shəs]
(geology)
The earliest epoch of the Cretaceous period of geologic time, extending from about 140- to 120,000,000 years ago.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Psittacosaurus was a very common dinosaur in the Early Cretaceous period - 125 million years ago - that lived in eastern Asia, especially north-east China.
Auroraceratops represents the only horned dinosaur in the group Neoceratopsia (the lineage leading to and including the large bodied ceratopsians such as Triceratops) from the Early Cretaceous with a complete skeleton.
Researchers who have unearthed a fossil of a crow-sized winged dinosaur that lived in the Early Cretaceous period China made another interesting discovery.
The present study focuses on Geochemical Source Rock evaluation of the Jurassic Chiltan Formation and Early Cretaceous Sember Formation.
Discovered in the northeastern Chinese province of Hebei, Jinguofortis lived in a dense forested environment with scattered lakes, which characterized this region during the early Cretaceous. About the size of a modern crow, the species had wide, short wings that may have aided maneuverability between the trees.
Of the living angiosperm lines recognized in the Early Cretaceous fossil record, one of the most common but least familiar to botanists is the small family Chloranthaceae, which consists today of four genera and about 75 species of herbs, shrubs, and small trees (Swamy, 1953; Endress, 1987; Todzia, 1993; Eklund et al., 2004).
"The teeth are of a type so highly evolved that I realised straight away I was looking at remains of Early Cretaceous mammals that more closely resembled those that lived during the latest Cretaceous - some 60 million years later in geological history.
Below Ghar is an Early Cretaceous Fm, explored in Iraq and known as Yamamah.
Leonidas Brikiatis, an independent biogeographer in Palaio Faliro, Greece, proposes that two strips of land bridged North America and Europe during the late Jurassic and early Cretaceous periods.
The strata were buried and put under pressure to high levels of thermal maturity during the Early Cretaceous and uplifted during the Late Cretaceous.