Middle English

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Related to Early Middle English: Early Modern English

Middle English

the English language from about 1100 to about 1450: main dialects are Kentish, Southwestern (West Saxon), East Midland (which replaced West Saxon as the chief literary form and developed into Modern English), West Midland, and Northern (from which the Scots of Lowland Scotland and other modern dialects developed)
References in periodicals archive ?
Early Middle English verse works, on the other hand, rely on alliteration only sporadically and do not regulate unstressed syllables in any conspicuous way--see, for example, Glowka (1984).
Word Derivation in Early Middle English. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.
The availability of the Linguistic Atlas of Early Middle English (Laing 2013-) makes it possible to fill this gap in the literature, and that is what this paper aims to do.
Mr Conduit added: "Verbs also seem to show persistent features from early Middle English.
Reflecting the increasing use of corpus linguistics in the history of syntax, they examine such topics as verb complementation in Old English, tracking and explaining variation and change in the grammar of American English from evidence in the TIME corpus, the "fail to" construction in late modern and present-day English, discontinuous quantificational structures in Old English, the reflexes of Old English beon as a marker of futurity in early Middle English, and stylistic fronting in the history of English.
It combines a freshly conceived theoretical view with penetrating analyses of Early Middle English texts.
The new dictionary was planned as a four-volume work with words dating back to the Early Middle English period (1150 AD).
Contents: Seth Lerer, "Old English and its Afterlife"; Susan Crane, "Anglo-Norman Cultures in England, 1066-1460"; Thomas Hahn, "Early Middle English"; Jocelyn Wogan-Browne and Lesley Johnson, "National, World, and Women's History: Writers and Readers in Post-Conquest England"; Christopher Baswell, "Latinitas"; Rosalind Field, "Romance in England, 1066-1400"; Brynley F.
These late Old English and early Middle English examples follow the general trend that was represented by AElfric.
Karl Reichl addresses the problems of reading the sparsely attested early Middle English love-lyric tradition by seeking analogues in other languages, offering a nineteenth-century Portuguese ballad in the folk tradition of the enchanted princess as an analogue for that locus classicus of the close-read medieval lyric, 'Maiden in the mor lay'.
These stories, like so many others of the tradition, in their poetic form, are the stuff of Old English and early Middle English literature, stories that will be retold by Chaucer and other writers right down to the present.
Early Middle English poet, author of the romance-chronicle the Brut (c.

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