Easel Art

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Easel Art

 

(stankovoe iskusstvo), a term used in the Soviet Union to designate works of painting, sculpture, and graphic art that are self-contained and, unlike works of monumental art or book illustration, are not specifically designed for a particular structure or publication. The content and expressiveness of a work of easel art remain constant even if the work is placed in a new setting. The term “easel art” derives from the stand or support on which the works of art are created. Easel art has developed extensively since the Renaissance; it was especially popular during the 19th century.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Her discussion of Ioganson's position is through a synopsis of his proposal, and its accompanying drawings, for his contribution to a proposed INKhUK publication "From Representation to Construction." Gough is attempting to demonstrate that it is in Ioganson's philosophies and art that one can see a challenge to the standard assumptions about the Constructivist transition from easel art to production.
More importantly, when Kahlo met Rivera, he was a leading proponent of a post-revolutionary movement known as Mexicanidad, which rejected Western European influences and the "easel art" of the aristocracy in favor of all things considered "authentically" Mexican, such as peasant handicrafts and pre-Columbian art.