Eastlake style

Eastlake style

(1870–1880)
A style characterized by a massive quality, in which posts, railings and balusters were turned on a mechanical lathe. Large curved brackets, scrolls, and other stylized elements are placed at every corner or projection along the facade. Perforated gables, carved panels, and a profusion of spindles and latticework along porch eaves are typical. Lighter elements are combined with oversized members to exaggerate the three-dimensional facade.

Eastlake ornamentation, Eastlake style

A style not of architecture but of ornamentation, associated with the English designer Charles Locke Eastlake (1836–1906). Decorative elements included: spindlework (especially balusters or posts turned on a lathe), perforated bargeboards and pediments, carved panels, large ornamental fanlike brackets, highly ornamental moldings, and decorative hardware fittings such as door knobs and locks.
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References in periodicals archive ?
An idea whose time has come, the Victorian Eastlake style is now being taken seriously by designers looking for new inspiration.
The interior woodwork and much of the furniture are in the Eastlake style.
Such details exemplify the Eastlake style, derived from the work of an English furniture designer (who was reportedly mortified to learn that Americans were applying his ideas to architecture).