Ebeko


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Ebeko

 

an active volcano in the northern part of the island of Paramushir, one of the northern Kuril Islands. The volcano, which rises to an elevation of 1,138 m, has three craters, each with a diameter of 250–350 m. The craters contain lakes, thermal springs, and solfataras. The volcano is composed of andesites and basalts. Eruptions occurred in 1793, 1859, 1934–35, 1963, and 1967.

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The Ebeko volcano on the Paramushir island, located in the Russain Kuril Islands archipelago, spewed out a column of ash to a height of 4.5 kilometers (2.8 miles), the press service of the Russian Emergencies Ministry's department in the Far Eastern Sakhalin Region said in a statement on Sunday,Sputnikreported.
"On November 4, the emergencies control center of the Russian Emergencies Ministry's department in the Sakhalin Region received information that the Ebeko volcano was seen throwing ash to a height of up to 4.5 kilometers.
Ebeko woke up in 2016 and has repeatedly thrown ash since then.
In the present work, we report new data on the chemical composition of native sulfur, leachates from native sulfur, and rare minerals as inclusions in native sulfur from Ebeko volcano (North Kuriles, Russian Far East) in order to understand the transport of elements in low-temperature fumarolic gases.
Ebeko is characterized by occasional phreatomagmatic eruptions and abundant permanent fumaroles and thermal springs [17].
Thirty samples of native sulfur (100-150 g each) were collected from the active and extinct fumaroles in the Northeast (NE), Southeast (SE), South, and July fumarolic fields at Ebeko volcano (Figure 1).
Twelve rock samples were collected at the Ebeko summit and its vicinities, including fresh volcanic bombs from the recent 2009 eruption and samples from the lava flows downstream of the Kuzminka and Yurieva Rivers.
The compositions of the analyzed Ebeko andesites are given in Table 1 (the average composition of 12 samples) and in Supplementary Table S3 (full results).
The list of the rare phases observed in the fumarolic sulfur of Ebeko volcano includes 21 rarely and moderately occurring minerals (Table 4, Figures 6 and 7) together with the major minerals of sulfur, opal, pyrite, and alunite.
This approach was implemented on the plot shown in Figure 8, which depicts the concentrations of 31 analyzed elements in the fumarolic sulfur of Ebeko compared to the concentrations of elements in 5% of the rock, that is, such concentrations that would be in sulfur if it contained 5 wt% of rock aerosol.
Acid Alteration and Origin of Sulfide Minerals in Ebeko Sulfur.
Fumarolic gases condense upon cooling to produce acid solutions at temperatures below or slightly above the boiling point of pure water at a given hypsometric level (~99[degrees]C for Ebeko).