Ebla


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Ebla

(ĕb`lə, ē`blə), an ancient city located in N Syria 34 mi (55 km) S of Aleppo. First excavated in 1964, the ruins of the city were discovered in 1973 by an Italian archaeological expedition from the Univ. of Rome. Most importantly, nearly 20,000 cuneiform tablets were discovered (1975) in the palace archives. The tablets date from the middle of the 3d millennium and are written in Eblaite, a Semitic dialect, as well as in Sumerian. A vocabulary list matching words from the two languages was found among the tablets, which has allowed scholars to translate the previously unknown language of Eblaite. The tablets relate mostly to economic matters, showing that Ebla was a major commercial center trading mostly in textiles, wood, and finished metals. Its influence rivaled that of Egypt and Mesopotamia, stretching from the Sinai peninsula to the Mesopotamian highlands. The documents have been taken to imply that Ebla had as many as 200,000 inhabitants and a government that was administered by 12,000 officials. One of Ebla's earliest dynasties ruled from about 2400 B.C. to 2250 B.C. and was probably destroyed by Naram-Sin of Akkad. Ebla flourished again (2000–1800 B.C.), but was unable to regain its former power. Most of the remaining ruins are from this period. The tablets contain the earliest known reference to Jerusalem. Some scholars claim they also name the five biblical "Cities of the Plain" (Sodom, Gomorah, Admah, Zeboiim, and Bela) just as they are named in Genesis, but this claim has been contested. As an aid to studying the Bible, the tablets are most valuable as a linguistic tool, helping to illuminate some of the more difficult Hebrew readings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Petro-Canada, a Canada-based gas company, has started producing around 80 million cubic feet of gas per day from Syria's Ebla gas project Dow Jones has reported, citing Jon Ferrier, the general manager of the company.
Around the excavated city of Ebla in northern Syria, discovered in 1975, a great Semitic empire spread from the Red Sea north to Turkey and east to Mesopotamia from 2500 to 2400 B.
Because therein is another question about the archives of Ebla--what other records were created in Ebla that would be beneficial to today's historians had they survived?
He studied under Dr Paolo Matthiae, the excavator of the 3rd millennium BC site of Ebla at Tell Mardikh, Syria, and with Dr William Dever of the University of Arizona at Tucson.
But the old man's attempts to recuperate the values of this world and to endow it with a teleology is almost immediately undermined by two ostensibly unrelated factors: a modernist style that privileges an interiorized private narrative over the collective myths of the Somali people, and the representation of Ebla as a subject alienated from the hearth, what the Somali call Jes (8-9).
His work is a veritable tour de force, reinterpreting a wide array of biblical texts and extra-biblical material from Ebla, Marl, Ugarit, Emar, and beyond, and engaging throughout in detailed linguistic, contextual, and theological argument.
Until now, knowledge of Early Bronze Age life in northern Mesopotamia, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, came largely from prior finds at Ebla, Zettler notes.
Initial nominations where made by CEOs from European companies in the FT Global 500, and the final winners were decided by a panel that consisted of EBLA 2008 winners from companies such as Arcelor Mittal, Autonomy, Fiat and GE, plus representatives from CNBC, the Financial Times and IMD business school.
An exhibition will also be held on the sidelines of the forum featuring stands of Techo Ejabi, Kinetco project, Ministry of Transport and Communications, Ebla and Katara.
Ghanem also visited the National Training Center at al-Besseh site, where he was briefed on the steps taken to extinguish six wells that terrorists had set fire to in Jahar field and that were liberated by the Syrian Arab Army, in addition to inspecting work at Ebla and the southern central area gas plants which provide around 10 million cubic meters of clean gas per day.
They cover building works at Palace G: the Ebla king between major-domos, carriers, and construction workers; from Ebla to Ugarit: lead ingots in the Levant and Anatolia during the Bronze Age; high, low, and in between: patterns of bureaucracy, storage, and mobilization of resources in Middle Bronze Age (2000-1600 BC) northern Levant; and the building of Tell 'Agaga/Sadikanni in Syria: some reflections.