Eblis


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Eblis

devil and father of devils, called Azazel before his fall. [Islam: Brewer Dictionary 319]
See: Devil
References in periodicals archive ?
in darkness wove the grass That kills our cattle, made the flowers that suck Man's life like dew-drops, evil seeds and shrubs That turn the sons of Adam into beasts Whom Eblis snatches from the sword-wide Bridge
Sedgwick discusses Beckford's use of this genre and particularly concentrates on the tale's preoccupation with the Halls of Eblis.
It was vital in shaping the intellectual background of the oriental writings of Walter Savage Landor, Robert Southey, Lord Byron, Shelley and Thomas Moore, who "adapted [Jones's] forms, themes, style, and subject matter, preceded by the fantastic evocations of Eblis in William Beckford's famous novel Vathek (1784), which was itself influenced by Jones's evocation of the dreamworld of pleasure" (qtd in Cannon and Brine 1995: 41).
one doomed to hell by his pride and rampant sexuality, traits familiarly ascribed in legendry to the devil and to Judas)--resembles another widely known Gothic villain, Beckford's depraved Caliph Vathek, who suffers the punishment of a sinner entering the halls of Eblis by having his heart set aflame.
Nobody enters the Halls of Eblis except voluntarily.
And Eblis is hinted at early in the angry Mahomet's prediction that his rebellious Caliph will never foresee 'the fate that awaits him' (4).
Eblis had five sons: Tir, author of fatal accidents; Awar, the demon of lubricity; Dasim, author of discord; Sut, father of lies; and Zalambur, author of mercantile dishonesty.
Vathek, the ninth caliph of the Abbasside dynasty, is a haughty, effeminate monarch, induced by his sorceress mother, the Greek Carathis, and by his own curiosity and egotism to offer allegiance to Eblis, the Devil, in the hope of obtaining the throne of the pre - Adamite sultans.
His name in Islam is Eblis, which, like devil, is derived from the Greek.