Eblis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Eblis

devil and father of devils, called Azazel before his fall. [Islam: Brewer Dictionary 319]
See: Devil
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Saving Allah there is no one Stronger than Eblis." 12 Kipling portrays Eblis as stronger than humans.
Vathek and his Giaour (the emissary of Eblis) reign supreme.
It was vital in shaping the intellectual background of the oriental writings of Walter Savage Landor, Robert Southey, Lord Byron, Shelley and Thomas Moore, who "adapted [Jones's] forms, themes, style, and subject matter, preceded by the fantastic evocations of Eblis in William Beckford's famous novel Vathek (1784), which was itself influenced by Jones's evocation of the dreamworld of pleasure" (qtd in Cannon and Brine 1995: 41).
(7) Nigel Leask, 'Wandering Through Eblis': Absorption and Containment in Romantic Exoticism', in Romanticism and Colonialism: Writing and Empire 1780-1830, ed.
(4.) As critic Nigel Leask has pointed out in "'Wandering Through Eblis': Absorption and Containment in Romantic Exoticism," an "unsigned review of June 1811 in the short-lived journal called the Literary Panorama, described Kehama as 'a series of shifting pictures .
On Sunday the action starts with Eblis at 2.30pm followed by Dig For Fire then The Pprinces of Monte Carlo take to the stage and wrapping things up at 5.30pm will be Crash landing.
Rivers, whose animosity toward Ralph produces his "hell-heart, which embitters everything about and within me" (103)--marking him out as a Satanic creature (i.e., one doomed to hell by his pride and rampant sexuality, traits familiarly ascribed in legendry to the devil and to Judas)--resembles another widely known Gothic villain, Beckford's depraved Caliph Vathek, who suffers the punishment of a sinner entering the halls of Eblis by having his heart set aflame.
There is the same suggestion of an ordained course in the episode of Barkiarokh: 'Every avenue was closed; swords swept glittering in all directions' -- all directions except to the Halls of Eblis. These Halls are the Arab Hell, partly taken from oriental tales and partly dreamed up by Beckford, and presided over by Eblis, like Satan a fallen archangel.
And Eblis is hinted at early in the angry Mahomet's prediction that his rebellious Caliph will never foresee 'the fate that awaits him' (4).
Vathek, the ninth caliph of the Abbasside dynasty, is a haughty, effeminate monarch, induced by his sorceress mother, the Greek Carathis, and by his own curiosity and egotism to offer allegiance to Eblis, the Devil, in the hope of obtaining the throne of the pre - Adamite sultans.