York

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York

, former name of Toronto, Canada
York, Ont.: see Toronto, Ont., Canada.

York

, city, England

York, city and unitary authority (2011 pop. 198,051), N England, at the confluence of the Ouse and Foss rivers. It is located at the historical junction of the three ridings of Yorkshire. York, a rail center, is especially noted for the manufacture of cocoa, chocolate, and confections. Instrument making, printing, and light engineering are among its other industries. Tourism is central to the area's economy.

York was a British settlement occupied by the ancient Brigantes. As Eboracum it was an important military post of the British province of the Roman Empire. Emperor Hadrian visited York in 120 and had an earthen rampart built to keep out the Picts and the Celts. The emperors Septimus Severus (211) and Constantius I (306) died there, and Constantine I was proclaimed emperor at York in 306. The city became a significant center in the Kingdom of Northumbria. In the 7th cent., St. Paulinus, the first archbishop of York, was consecrated. The city's archbishopric is the ecclesiastical center of N England, second only to Canterbury in importance. In the 8th cent., York was one of the most famous educational centers in Europe. Alcuin was born there and became the headmaster of St. Peter's School, one of the oldest public schools in England. York was the Viking city of Jorvik from 867–1067.

The Cathedral of St. Peter, commonly known as York Minster, occupies the site of the wooden church in which King Edwin was baptized by St. Paulinus on Easter Day in 627. The edifice dates partly from the Norman period. Many other notable medieval structures remain in York. The ancient portion of the city is enclosed by walls dating in part from Norman times, but mainly from the 14th cent. Four of the gates, including Micklegate and Monk Bar, still stand. The Univ. of York was founded in 1963. The York Plays (see miracle play) reached their height in the 15th cent. and were revived at the Yorkshire Festival of 1951.


York

, city, United States
York, city (1990 pop. 42,192), seat of York co., SE Pa., on Codorus Creek, in an agricultural area; laid out 1741, inc. as a city 1887. It is a market, trade, processing, and distribution center in the Pennsylvania Dutch country. In addition to food and related products, its factories make monorail systems, turbines, controls, stoneware, dinnerware, nuclear components, motorcycles, armored vehicles, swimming pools, and office furniture. York was a meeting place (1777–78) of the Continental Congress. During the Civil War, it was occupied briefly (1863) by Confederates. York College of Pennsylvania and a campus of Pennsylvania State Univ. are in the city. Several colonial houses remain.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

York

 

a city and port in Great Britain in the county of Yorkshire, on the Ouse River. Population, 104, 500 (1971). York is an important transportation junction. It has food (especially chocolates), glass, and printing industries. Railroad workshops are also located in the city.

York originally was a Roman fortress. It was founded circa A.D. 71 on the site of a Briton settlement. It was the capital of the Anglo-Saxon (from the sixth century) and Danish (ninth century) kingdoms. In 735, York became the seat of the archbishop of York. During the English Bourgeois Revolution of the 17th century, it was the temporary residence of Charles I (1642–44). In 1644 it was seized by the Parliamentarians.

York is the site of Roman and medieval fortifications, 15th-and 16th-century houses, and a Gothic cathedral (1070–1470). The Yorkshire Museum (archaeology) and the City of York Art Gallery are located there.

REFERENCE

Knight, C. B. A History of the City of York. York-London, 1944.

York

 

a city in the eastern USA, in Pennsylvania. Population, 50, 000 (1970; including the suburbs, 320, 000). There were 60, 000 people engaged in industry in York in 1969. The city is a large center for various branches of machine building and metalworking. Products include turbines, air conditioners, refrigerators, safes, agricultural equipment, and bearings. Upright and grand pianos are also manufactured. There are tobacco and textile industries in the city. York was founded in 1735.


York

 

a cape on Cape York Peninsula, the northernmost point of the Australian mainland (10°4r S lat. and 142°32’ E long.).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

York

1
1. the English royal house that reigned from 1461 to 1485 and was descended from Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York (1411--60), whose claim to the throne precipitated the Wars of the Roses. His sons reigned as Edward IV and Richard III
2. Alvin C(ullum). 1887--1964, US soldier and hero of World War I
3. Duke of, full name Prince Frederick Augustus, Duke of York and Albany. 1763--1827, second son of George III of Great Britain and Ireland. An undistinguished commander-in-chief of the British army (1798--1809), he is the "grand old Duke of York" of the nursery rhyme
4. Prince Andrew, Duke of. born 1960, second son of Elizabeth II of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. He married (1986) Miss Sarah Ferguson; they divorced in 1996; their first daughter, Princess Beatrice of York, was born in 1988 and their second, Princess Eugenie of York, in 1990

York

2
1. a historic city in NE England, in York unitary authority, North Yorkshire, on the River Ouse: the military capital of Roman Britain; capital of the N archiepiscopal province of Britain since 625, with a cathedral (the Minster) begun in 1154; noted for its cycle of medieval mystery plays; unusually intact medieval walls; university (1963). Pop.: 137 505 (2001)
2. a unitary authority in NE England, in North Yorkshire. Pop.: 183 100 (2003 est.). Area: 272 sq. km (105 sq. miles)
3. Cape. a cape in NE Australia, in Queensland at the N tip of the Cape York Peninsula, extending into the Torres Strait: the northernmost point of Australia
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005