ecclesiastical

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ecclesiastical

of or relating to the Christian Church
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It is difficult to think of another major sacramental or ecclesial practice that has collapsed as completely and as spectacularly as auricular confession has in the past 50 years.
Wingeier-Rayo offers a useful, objective ethnographic study of two communities in Cuernavaca, Mexico, to illustrate the parallel and occasionally contrasting contributions of Pentecostal and Catholic Ecclesial Base Communities to the situation of the poor.
Here Loehe saw a necessary and important ecclesial responsibility: he wanted to prepare these women as deaconesses for "a female Christian service of charity" (7) toward those in need of care, i.e., care of the sick, care of the handicapped, child care, and so on.
We transact our liturgies as if the stories of Israel were but prelude or background to the Church's own story (the ecclesial equivalent of the "optional text" or "supplemental reading").
She described lay ecclesial ministers as "servant leaders, men and women who are called to catechize and evangelize people they serve directly under the bishop.
In this essay, I propose that Vatican II, in turning anew to God, marks a conversion of the Catholic ecclesial imagination.
As someone whose area of ecumenical engagement involves inter-religious dialogue and cooperation, I found this text an encouragement to ponder afresh the impact and implications of visible ecclesial unity in religiously pluralistic contexts on (a) Christian self-understanding and (b) Christian witness--two areas which the programme in Inter-Religious Dialogue and Cooperation of the World Council of Churches has been thinking theologically about.
This paper shows that lack of explicit and clearly stated intentions regarding the development of Catholic students' ecclesial agency through their schooling leads to potential problems as they experience and imagine themselves as lay persons in the Church.
At the heart of this study is the fifth chapter, "The Anglican Approach to Ecclesial Authority." Here Locke addresses the present ambiguity of ecclesial authority in the worldwide communion with a firm grasp of the formative historical forces and a keen understanding of the theological issues involved.
"Lay ecclesial minister" is a broader category than just pastoral coordinators, or what are increasingly being called "parish life coordinators." Lay ecclesial ministers include pastoral associates, directors of religious education, youth ministers, hospital chaplains, etc.
The book deals with the topic from the perspective of ecclesial movements.
But leaders who tolerate such division in a Catholic institution under the banner of diversity of perspectives, freedom, or tolerance, are engaging in a kind of self-deception; for they substitute the genuine good of ecclesial unity for the empirical aspect of unity--that is, the feeling and appearance of a unified community.