Eclogues


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Eclogues

short pieces by Roman poet Vergil with pastoral setting. [Rom. Lit.: Benét, 1053]
References in periodicals archive ?
The theme of revenge pervades the West Indian Eclogues, but it plays a central role in the fourth and final eclogue.
And although the three eclogues were not composed chronologically, there is a kind of progression in terms of the representation of the river in all three (16).
While the poem does remain somewhat derivative of the Marotic Gallic style in both form and content, Sceve's innovations with regard to certain basic literary elements as well as his negotiation of bucolic models from the Latin tradition (specifically, Sannazaro) help separate his pastoral from Marot's first two eclogues and align it more germanely with his own (Petrarchan) poetic enterprise in 1536, thus making the case that Arion merits careful reconsideration.
Although scholars have focused on Encina's concerns with respect to his recognition as poet and then criticism of the Duke for his lack of recompense within the second half of the eclogue, one could argue that these concerns begin, in fact, in the opening section of the play.
Eclogues II, VII and the Helicon--The Collage Cycle
Studies in the structure of the Eclogues have been periodically popular, but since the publication of Van Sickle's The Design of Vergil's 'Bucolics' in 1978, very little has been published on the subject.
This article nuances Ross's broad claim for Linus's metapoetic function in the Eclogues to offer the specific suggestion that Vergil discovered in Linus a character whose diverse literary genealogy permitted him to explore the complex interplay of writing and singing in poetic composition.
He later explains that the popularity of the pastoral novel in early modern Spain can be attributed to the mystery of the characters' identity: "Disguise, in the eclogue especially, is a key to pastoral's effectiveness since the varied forms of the genre have been used for historical, political, and social revision as well as for essential love and friendship thematic" (3).
Another attempt to define FitzGerald's "structural purpose," and one which argues that the English poem follows the model of Virgil's Eclogues, is provided by D.
and dogmatic shepherds like Piers within the eclogues reveals 'the failure of a certain kind of allegorising commentary and the interpretive relationship which underlies it' (p.
Simpson (1997:115, 116, 117) observes that in these eclogues Virgil tacitly acknowledges that "[t]he order of reality .
Viewing the eclogues in their religious aspect, he finds God alternatively beneficent, hostile, demanding, and finally, in the last two poems, appearing as "an actively providential deity" (60).