Economic Commission for Latin America


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Economic Commission for Latin America

 

(ECLA), a regional body established in 1948 by the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations. The Latin American states, the USA, Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, Canada, and Spain are members of the ECLA. The purposes of the ECLA are the development and implementation of measures that promote the economic development of the Latin American states and strengthen economic cooperation both among the Latin American countries and between those countries and states on other continents. For these purposes, ECLA conducts studies of economic, social, and technical problems; collects, summarizes, and disseminates information and statistics on such problems; and offers advice and makes recommendations to its members on matters falling within its competence.

The highest organ of ECLA is the plenary session, which is held every two years. Between sessions, a committee meets periodically to review the commission’s work and prepare the ECLA report for the Economic and Social Council. The permanent executive organ is the Secretariat, which is located in Santiago, Chile. It has subsidiary offices in Mexico City; Washington, D.C.; Rio de Janeiro; Montevideo; Bogotá; and Port-of–Spain.

Various subsidiary bodies operate within the framework of ECLA. They include the Central American Economic Cooperation Committee, the Trade Committee, and the High-level Governmental Committee on the Regional Evaluation of the International Development Strategy. The Latin American Institute for Economic and Social Planning and the Regional Center for Demographic Training and Research in Latin America operate under the aegis of ECLA.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
NON-COMPETITIVE (Relative productivity in companies, according to size in percentages) Micro- small medium- large enterprises firms sized firms companies Argentina 24% 36% 47% 100% Brazil 10% 27% 40% 100% Chile 3% 26% 46% 100% Mexico 16% 35% 60% 100% Peru 6% 16% 50% 100% Germany 67% 70% 83% 100% Spain 46% 63% 77% 100% France 71% 75% 80% 100% Italy 42% 64% 82% 100% European 58% 74% 85% 100% Union Source: Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, Eclac.
The Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) projects that Mexico's economy will grow 1.0 percent during 2002, after registering a decline of 0.1 percent in 2001.
SANTIAGO- The Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) says Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows in the Caribbean shrank in 2018.
Washington, Shawwal 9, 1435, Aug 5, 2014, SPA -- The United Nations' Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean estimates that the region's economy will expand 2.2% this year, a sharp decline from a previous forecast of 2.7%.
Andrei Jouravlev, economic affairs officer of the division of natural resources of the Economic Commission for Latin America, thinks that what's required to optimize the use of water in the region is good institutional management.
Direct foreign investment in Latin America and the Caribbean is expected to rebound 40 to 50 percent in 2010 following a "stormy" year hit by the international economic crisis, said the head of the U.N's Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean.
In order to help policymakers chart a new direction, economists with the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, Washington Office, examine how the global economy arrived at its current predicament, tracing the sequence of events that created havoc in financial markets, and the policy responses these events elicited.
Panama's gross domestic product (GDP) expanded by eight percent in 2007--the fastest rate in Latin America--and is expected to hold in that range during 2008, according to a forecast by the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, or ECLAC.
For further evidence of just how advanced FTAA plans are, there is an elaborate official website of the "FTAA process" maintained by "the Tripartite Committee, consisting of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the Organization of American States (OAS) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC)." Under the conditions of TPA as given to President Bush by Congress, it is likely that an FTAA agreement will be presented to Congress sometime in 2004 or 2005 for a simple up or down vote with no amendments possible.
The United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and The Caribbean (ECLAC) presented the current structure of the sector in the region, while the Central American Bank for Economic Integration (BCIE) provided information on the lines of credit available to finance trade.
The 2001 economic expansion statistics released by the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) projects that every nation in Latin America is likely to achieve a modest degree of economic expansion, with the exception of Peru.

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