Edessa


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Edessa

(ĭdĕs`ə), ancient city of Mesopotamia, on the site of modern ŞanlıurfaŞanlıurfa
, formerly Urfa
, city (1990 pop. 278,516), capital of Şanlıurfa prov., SE Turkey. It is the trade center for a productive agricultural region and one of the most rapidly growing cities in Turkey due to its position in the midst of a
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, Turkey. It emerged in the 4th cent. B.C. as Orrhoe, or Arrhoe, and was later named Edessa by Seleucus I of Syria. From c.137 B.C. it was the capital of the independent kingdom of Osroene. It later became a Roman city. There in A.D. 260, Shapur I of Persia defeated Emperor Valerian and took him prisoner. Edessa was a center of Christianity by the 3d cent. A.D. and became one of the major religious centers of the Byzantine Empire. The city fell to the Arabs in 639 and remained in Muslim hands until captured by the Crusaders in 1098. Baldwin (later Baldwin I of Jerusalem) became the ruler of Edessa, and when he became king, he turned it over to one of his cousins. The city, however, fell to the Muslims in 1144 and passed to the Ottoman Empire by 1637.

Edessa

1. an ancient city on the N edge of the Syrian plateau, founded as a Macedonian colony by Seleucus I: a centre of early Christianity
2. a market town in Greece: ancient capital of Macedonia. Pop.: 15 980 (latest est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Diversity of hemipterans collected from cowpea crops in Teresina, Piaui, Brazil: (1) Crinocerus sanctus (F.); (2) Hypselonotus fulvus (De Geer); (3) Phthia picta (Drury); (4) Zoreva sp.; (5) Coreidae sp.; (6) Euschistus heros (F.); (7) Euschistus carbonerus (Rolston); (8) Chinavia ubica (Rolston); (9) Dichelops melacanthus (Dallas); (10) Dichelops furcatus (F.); (11) Piezodorus guildinii (Westwood); (12) Edessa meditabunda (F.); (13) Edessa tragulus (Breddin); (14) Edessa loxdalii (Westwood); (15) Thyanta perditor (F.); (16) Mormidea notulifera (Stal); (17) Cyptocephala alvarengai (Rolston); (18) Alcaeorrhynchus grandis (Dallas); (19) Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas).
Los Pentatomidae numericamente dominantes en cultivos de soja de la pampa ondulada (Argentina) son, en orden decreciente, Piezodorus guildinii (Westwood), Nezara viridula (Linnaeus), Dichelops furcatus (Fabricius), Edessa meditabunda (Fabricius), Chinavia armigera (Stal)) y Edessa rufomarginata (De Geer).
Dello stesso taglio e il saggio di Francesca dell'Acqua (65-98) che studia le vicende dell'icona sacra, il Mandylion che da Edessa e arrivato a Genova, saggio solidissimo che rappresenta il ruolo della religione e dell'arte nell'incontro delle culture.
Jacques Chahine, general manager of Edessa, a company which conducts EIA and studies for prospective companies that want to enter the infectious waste treatment market, corroborates that challenges exist in the sector.
It was looted in the 1990s from near Edessa, and bought by the DMA at Christie's New York in 1999.
Ants and other predators reduced the infestation of Eunica bechina Talbot 1928 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) and Edessa rufomarginata (De Geer, 1773) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), Prodiplosis floricola Felt 1907 (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), petiole gall insects (Flymenoptera: Chalcidoidea)
It is also the ancient Edessa, a site conquerors from Alexander the Great onwards have fought over to win.
Despite major setbacks, including Zengi's conquest of Edessa and the failure of the Second Crusade, the mid-twelfth-century kingdom of Jerusalem remained secure, although lack of resources soon drove Kings Baldwin III and Amalric to attempt the conquest of Egypt.