J. Edgar Hoover

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Hoover, J. Edgar

(John Edgar Hoover), 1895–1972, American administrator, director of the Federal Bureau of InvestigationFederal Bureau of Investigation
(FBI), division of the U.S. Dept. of Justice charged with investigating all violations of federal laws except those assigned to some other federal agency.
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 (FBI), b. Washington, D.C. Shortly after he was admitted to the bar, he entered (1917) the Dept. of Justice and served (1919–21) as special assistant to Attorney General A. Mitchell PalmerPalmer, Alexander Mitchell
, 1872–1936, American politician, b. Moosehead, Pa. Admitted (1893) to the bar, he built up a large law practice, became a leader in the state Democratic party, and served (1909–15) in Congress.
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. In this capacity he directed the so-called Palmer Raids against allegedly radical aliens. Director of the Bureau of Investigation (renamed the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1935) after 1924, Hoover built a more efficient crime-fighting agency, establishing a centralized fingerprint file, a crime laboratory, and a training school for police. During the 1930s, to publicize the work of his agency in fighting organized crime, he participated directly in the arrest of several major gangsters. After World War II, Hoover focused on the perceived threat of Communist subversion. In office until his death, he became increasingly controversial. His many critics considered his anticommunism obsessive, and it has been verified that he orchestrated systematic harassment of political dissenters and activists, including Martin Luther KingKing, Martin Luther, Jr.,
1929–68, American clergyman and civil-rights leader, b. Atlanta, Ga., grad. Morehouse College (B.A., 1948), Crozer Theological Seminary (B.D., 1951), Boston Univ. (Ph.D., 1955).
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, Jr. Hoover accumulated enormous power, in part from amassing secret files on the activities and private lives of political leaders and their associates. After his death reforms designed to prevent these abuses were undertaken. His writings include Persons in Hiding (1938), Masters of Deceit (1958), and A Study of Communism (1962).

Bibliography

See biographies by T. G. Powers (1987), A. G. Theoharis (1988), and C. Gentry (1991); D. J. Garrow, The FBI and Martin Luther King, Jr. (1981); K. O'Reilly, Hoover and the Un-Americans (1983); A. G. Theoharis and J. S. Cox, The Boss (1988); B. Burrough, Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933–34 (2004).

Hoover, J. (John) Edgar

(1895–1972) director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, lawyer, criminologist; born in Washington, D.C. He attended night classes at George Washington University while working as a clerk at the Library of Congress. After being admitted to the District of Columbia bar (1917) he became special assistant to Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer and led the controversial "Palmer Raids" against alleged seditionists. Advancing from assistant (1921) to director (1924) of the Bureau of Investigation (which became the FBI in 1935), he remained director under every president from Coolidge to Nixon. Hoover emphasized modern technological investigative techniques, improved training, and obtained increased funding from Congress. During the 1930s, FBI exploits against notorious gangsters made him a national hero. In the 1940s and 1950s he became well-known for his anti-Communist and antisubversive views and activities. In the 1960s he became a problematic political figure due to his lack of sympathy for the civil rights movement and the Kennedy administration. His reputation declined in later years following revelations concerning his vendettas against liberal activists, notably Martin Luther King Jr., and widespread illegal FBI activities.
References in periodicals archive ?
You can't tell the story of American law enforcement without telling the story of the FBI, and you certainly can't tell the story of the FBI without telling the story of J Edgar Hoover.
Edgar Hoover, who headed the United States' Federal Bureau of Investigation since 1924, died in Washington at the age of seventy-seven".
Edgar Hoover type and I really wanted to tell his story.
Edgar Hoover, having seated himself at the aforementioned corner table in the restaurant now called Nicholas, began to scrutinize the luncheon clientele with a practiced eye.
People in the know in Las Vegas said mafia won [euro]725k on result AGENTS' MEMO SENT TO FBI BOSS J EDGAR HOOVER
BORN J Edgar Hoover, US official, 1895 JD Salinger, US author, 1919 HOLLIDAY Grainger, UK actress, 1988, above DIED HANK Williams, US singer, 1953 CESAR Romero, US actor, above, 1994 SHIRLEY Chisholm, US politician, 2005
Lucky then that the man who was Dirty Harry is at the helm of this ambitious biopic of FBI colossus J Edgar Hoover.
Music Middlesbrough Little Theatre Company takes to the stage with their latest production, Willy Russell's epic tale of Liverpool life, Blood Brothers, Wednesday to Saturday, Middlesbrough Theatre Music Stranglers legend Hugh Cornwell is on Teesside next week to dispel the myth there are No More Heroes ARC, Stockton, Thursday Music Former Seahorses frontman Chris Helme plays an intimate solo set on Teesside Medicine Bar, Middlesbrough, tonight Film J Edgar Hoover is played with gusto by Leonardo DiCaprio in Clint Eastwood's film J Edgar (15) Cineworld & Showcase Walk The upper reaches of the River Tees have any number of dramatic settings, but perhaps the finest of all are to be found between Whorlton and Abbey Bridge, left Whorlton - 6' miles
DiCaprio plays a cross-dressing FBI chief J Edgar Hoover in his latest flick 'J Edgar'.
Q ARE you playing the reprehensible J Edgar Hoover and will you wear a dress?
Edgar Hoover, head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, in a 1950 letter to the White House.
Former fbi director J Edgar Hoover drew up a list of Americans he suspected of being disloyal and put forward a plan to have them arrested, newly declassified papers have revealed.