Edinburgh Review


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Edinburgh Review

influential literary and political review, founded in 1802, inaugurating new literary standards. [Br. Lit.: Barnhart, 375]
References in classic literature ?
The Edinburgh Review,' suggested and first conducted, in 1802, by the witty clergyman and reformer Sydney Smith, passed at once to the hands of Francis (later Lord) Jeffrey, a Scots lawyer who continued to edit it for nearly thirty years.
Leading the charge was the Edinburgh Review, which in July 1808 reinforced Samuel Whitbread's warning against "being romantic in the cause of [Spanish] liberty.
Nowadays few are those (even academic specialists) who read or have read the Edinburgh Review.
The essays include such topics as revaluing nineteenth-century Scottish literature, the national literatures of Scotland and the USA, the Edinburgh Review and the outside world, hero ballads as a form of resistance, lateral biography, the iconography of the nineteenth-century soldier, Scottish orientalism, missionary tales of Africa, Scottish/Germanic literary tradition in the Romantic period, Nietzsche in Glasgow, Stevenson's journeys, and the enchanted worlds of Scott, Scotland, and the Grimm.
Longmans also published periodicals including the Edinburgh Review, the Annual Register, and the English Historical Review.
The influence in question concerns ideal attachment, one of its sources here being a notice in the Edinburgh Review of Sismondi's Literature of the South with some passing reflections on Petrarch and Laura.
2) Sydney Smith review of Bentham's Book of Fallacies 42 Edinburgh Review 367 (1825).
Australia was no exception and most of the well to do residents had their subscriptions to periodicals like Household Words, Edinburgh Review, Fraser's Magazine The Athenaeum and Fortnightly Review to mention a few of the better known periodicals.
At the beginning of the nineteenth century, William Hazlitt hailed the first great politico-cultural periodical, the Edinburgh Review, as the 'highest rank of modern literary society', and its London and New York descendants retain more than a little of that old cachet.
Patmore sums up his distaste in an Edinburgh Review essay wherein he argues that the "chief characteristics" of Spasmodic verse are "violence and incongruity, .
For two centuries, magazines and journals have been at the centre of revolution and reform, from the Rambler to the Edinburgh Review to the Nineteenth Century to the Bulletin, the New Statesman and right up to Meanjin, Private Eye, the Nation Review and the one you are now reading.

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