Edmonton

(redirected from Edmontonian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Edmonton

(ĕd`məntən), city (1991 pop. 616,741), provincial capital, central Alta., Canada, on the North Saskatchewan River. The center of the largest metropolitan area in Alberta, Edmonton, known as the "Gateway to the North," is located in the center of the province between the fertile valleys of the south and the rich resources of the north. It is a major market center for farm and petrochemical products, and has an economy based on the production of oil, coal, and natural gas. Other industries include lumbering, meatpacking, flour milling, and dairying.

The city is on the site of Edmonton House, an important 19th-century trading post, and is also the site of the West Edmonton Mall (1981), North America's largest. The Univ. of Alberta (1906), Athabasca Univ. (1972), and other education institutions are in the city. Edmonton's National Hockey League team, the Oilers, was the dominant team in the 1980s, winning five championships (1984–85, 1987–88, 1990) under the leadership of Wayne GretzkyGretzky, Wayne
(Wayne Douglas Gretzky), 1961–, Canadian ice hockey player, b. Brantford, Ont. He played with the Edmonton Oilers (1978–88), Los Angeles Kings (1988–96), St. Louis Blues (1996), and New York Rangers (1997–99).
..... Click the link for more information.
. Canadian football's Eskimos also play there.

The dominant center for the western fur trade during the 19th cent., Edmonton grew slowly in the 20th cent., relying on its agriculture-based economy. Before World War II it was only the ninth largest city in Canada, but the discovery (1947) of petroleum at Leduc, Redwater, and Pembina transformed Edmonton into one of the fastest-growing cities in Canada. Its population increased more than sixfold from 1941 to 1987.

Edmonton

 

a city in western Canada, on the North Saskatchewan River. Capital of the province of Alberta. Population, 518,000 (1973; including suburbs). Edmonton is an important center for transportation, commercial distribution, industry, finance, and culture in western Canada. Oil refining and and petroleum chemistry are important industries. Enterprises include a pipe-rolling mill, a plant for the production of oil-drilling equipment, and factories for the processing of agricultural raw material. The city has a university.

Edmonton

a city in W Canada, capital of Alberta: oil industry. Pop.: 782 101 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
A prominent Edmontonian, Harry Flowers, his wife and two other persons ventured out on the lake in a rowboat.
This initiative will allow more Edmontonians and their families to enjoy Edmontons world-class metropolitan River Valley park system.
58) The October 1966 vote in favour of the first METS structure in the plebiscite that SOPA worked so hard to force suggested that Janzen's perspective found favour among a significant number of Edmontonians.
McCallum hopes this program will ease the anxiety that Edmontonians have about real estate: "We're offering the Buyer Protection Plan as a way to motivate Edmontonians into a housing market with great rates and selection.
This study surveyed 822 Edmontonians by phone and included questions about age, gender, education, employment, marital status and household annual income - and whether they had moved since 2002.
Assume the data show that fifty of the Calgarians and twenty of the Edmontonians share a propensity to the disease.
Edmontonians paid $1,915 more per capita than they received.
During his lifetime, he served on the boards of some of Canada's leading companies, and was the recipient of many awards, including his investiture as a Member of the Order of Canada in 2001 and being named one of the "100 Edmontonians of the Century" in 2004.
The outcomes and indicators outlined in this report were largely developed from recommendations in a March 2005 Inclusive Cities Canada report that involved broad consultation with Edmontonians," says John Kolkman, ESPC Research and Policy Analysis Coordinator.
Her most recent awards include the Sarah Shorten Award of the Canadian Association of University Teachers (2001), the Governor General's Award in Commemoration of the Persons Case (2002), the Gordin Kaplan Award of the Canadian Federation of Biological Societies (2003), Maclean's honor roll of Ten Canadians Making a Difference (2003), the American Chemical Society Award for Encouraging Women into the Chemical Sciences (2004), the Distinguished Alumna Award from the University of Alberta (2004), and one of 100 Edmontonians of the Century (2004).
She was named to the City of Edmonton's Cultural Hall of Fame in 1992 in the builder category and in 2004, during Edmonton's centennial celebrations, was named as one of the city's 100 Edmontonians of the century, recognizing, among other things, her efforts to introduce Cree classes into city schools.
It has thus been a source of particular pride to Edmontonians that a young, family-owned company should have grown so fast and maintained its headquarters in the city of its origin.